Roundups

Morning Shots: Thank You, Jon Hamm, For Being Abnormally Good-Looking

a cup of coffee
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The Chicago Tribune asks whether a popular book ensures a popular movie — a question on many minds as the Stieg Larsson books fly off the shelves and head to Hollywood.

Anthony Bourdain is always good for a few candid remarks about people other than himself, and he does not disappoint in this interview leading up to the 100th episode of his show, No Reservations.

Speaking of which, Noel Murray has a great essay at the A.V. Club about the general matter of reality shows tending to flame out unattractively, no matter how good they originally are.

First it seemed like Jennifer Lopez was coming to American Idol, then it seemed like maybe she wasn't, but now it looks like things are on again.

Many people own Dan Brown books, but many people get rid of them, too, says this look at the titles most commonly donated to book shops in the UK.

Using one of my favorite turns of phrase in quite some time, the Telegraph pays tribute to "the almost freakishly benign gift to the civilised world that is Jon Hamm’s handsomeness."

A smart essay at Slashfilm chronicles the rise of self-awareness in cinema, looking at both camera-aimed winks and meta-films that ultimately serve as sendups of already existing genres. It's an interesting piece in light of the rise of what it deems "deliberate unoriginality," which isn't necessarily a bad thing in all cases.

If you've ever taken small children to a 3D movie, you know that for some of them, it kind of freaks them out. And what that means to some people is that a 3D movie might get a different rating than the 2D version of the same movie. At least in Sweden.

How many pounds did this year's crop of major September fall fashion magazines weigh? (You heard me.) The Wrap has the story.

Are you in favor of or against the ironic collecting of bad art? Either way, you might be interested in this story in The New York Times.

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