Roundups

Morning Shots: The Statistics Are In On The Bieber-Twitter Connection

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You have to hand it to The Atlantic for this headline: "When 'Bite Me' Is 'Off The Record.'"

The fact that there's been a boom in Amish-themed romance novels (really!) has been in the news off and on for a while now; Galleycat has an update as it wonders whether, strictly from a trend perspective, Amish romance is the new vampire romance.

Three percent of all Twitter traffic is related to Justin Bieber, who has his own dedicated servers. I just want you to understand what we face.

As BBC4 begins airing the fourth season of Mad Men, The Guardian has this great piece about the writing of the show in particular, observing, "The series's extraordinary freedom is a product of its discipline."

Was this summer's Kick-Ass the bomb it has the reputation of being? Perhaps not. Not every opening weekend can be overcome, but it's a very fair point that the opening weekend is not the movie's entire lifespan.

I want to make one more pitch — just one more — for BBC America's wonderful The Choir, which begins its final story tonight: the creation of a community choir in the somewhat hard-up town of South Oxhey. If the first two stories were about teaching kids who had never really experienced music, it's perhaps even more moving to see adults who may have lived fifty years without having the opportunity to fully explore an innate love of singing in an organized way. It's really so, so great — please catch it tonight at 10:00 p.m. on BBC America.

Jenny Slate started last year on Saturday Night Live with the dual challenges that (1) the dumping of Michaela Watkins seemed unceremonious and ill-advised; and (2) she managed to swear live on her first episode. Now, she's reportedly headed out the door after one season. If the current reports are correct, the show will continue to increase its male-female ratio, getting rid of Slate and adding one woman and three men to the "featured players" list.

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