Roundups

Morning Shots: A Wretched Twist On Not Seeing The Bride Before The Wedding

a cup of coffee
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Vulture has a great interview with Boardwalk Empire's Michael K. Williams (that's Omar from The Wire), which may make you love him more than you already do. It's awfully refreshing to hear a guy say something about fame like, "People could stop me for a lot worse reasons than to talk about The Wire. So I embrace it." (Also: note that he is willing to appear on The Office. GET ON THAT.)

Cinematical has completed a merger with Moviefone/AOL, so check out their new digs, including this amusing list of Five Things All Star Trek Fans Should Own.

Could the Oprah/Franzen detente be happening at last? There are hints that in this, her last season on the air, The Oprah will be choosing Freedom as one of her book club selections.

You know, I try not to be an alarmist when it comes to stupid ideas for reality shows. If we can survive as a species after Joe Millionaire, then we can survive most things. But a show where you reveal your post-plastic-surgery face to your groom from under your veil at your wedding? I am prepared to say this is the worst idea for a television show that I have ever heard.

On the occasion of the sentencing of George Michael, The Guardian looks at a brief history of pop stars serving time.

If you asked me to name my five favorite records in the world, you'd probably find The New Pornographers' Mass Romantic on that list. But for those who haven't heard of the band before, the name sometimes is a little bit of a jolt — and in fact, it recently cost them a concert appearance.

It seems to be the thing to do for the stars of once-beloved TV shows to mercilessly encourage their fans to believe a movie version of the show may appear one day, even though that almost never happens. The latest to join the fray is Lauren Graham, who is now saying that there could be a Gilmore Girls movie. Can nothing be allowed to just ... end? Quietly?

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