Roundups

Morning Shots: In Which Kid Rock Tries To Talk Some Sense Into Steven Tyler

a cup of coffee
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Rolling Stone won't give you its entire Conan O'Brien cover story free, but there are some telling excerpts here.

Speaking of Rolling Stone, they also have this item, in which Steven Tyler learns the hard lesson that in every man's life, there comes a moment in which even Kid Rock thinks he's doing "the stupidest thing he's ever done in his life."

I would stop linking to Best Week Ever compilations of hilarious Halloween costumes, except that they keep being great. Here are the 50 Most Terrifying Sesame Street Costumes.

Now, the funny thing about this map, which assigns a movie to each state, is that the Huffington Post sniffs that someone has pointed out that Fargo isn't in Minnesota, duh. To which I unfortunately must sniff in return that Fargo doesn't take place in Fargo, duh, but mostly in Brainerd, Minnesota (home of the Paul Bunyan statue), and identifying the film with Minnesota is 100 percent correct and in no way a mistake.

Eternal questions: Tastes great, or less filling? Boxers, or briefs? As Princess Diana, Charlize Theron or Kiera Knightley?

The National Park Service has given up some very vague details about the plans for this weekend's Rally For Sanity And/Or Fear, based on the Colbert/Stewart permit applications.

In a video I admit has little value except that it's kind of warmly and mischievously funny, a sports reporter notes that hanging out in San Francisco for the World Series, he's surrounded by people "smoking weed." It doesn't sound funny, but when you watch it, it ... kind of is.

And finally: Roger Sterling's book about his life, Sterling's Gold, is not just a Mad Men plot device. It's also a real book that you can buy, meaning that it's also a Mad Men marketing device.

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