Roundups

Morning Shots: Skating 'Stars' Even Less Famous Than Dancing 'Stars'

a cup of coffee
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I actually watched the season of The Real World that Sean Duffy was on. Now he's a Congressman. Can Puck be far behind?

For some reason, ABC is trying Skating With The Stars, despite the fact that Fox's Skating With Celebrities tanked a few years ago. They've just announced the cast, which makes the cast of an average season of Dancing With The Stars look like an entire wax museum full of very very very legitimately famous people.

And also from Vulture: The track list for the next Glee record gives away certain things, one of which involves ... well, I don't want to spoil it. Read it for yourself.

If you're interested in what Tim Gunn really thought about the end of Project Runway, he was captured on video speaking at a recent event where he explained his reaction to the winner, both with what he said and with what he ... gestured, I guess you'd say.

I firmly believe in reading any story called "The Post's problematic 'Dancing Bears' video."

You read a lot about the coveted 18-34 demo in reading about television, but NBC is making the argument that the 55-64 demographic should be much more highly regarded than it is. This is helpful if, let's just say for instance, your programming has trouble picking up the 18-34 demo.

Say, James Franco — you've got the Danny Boyle film 127 Hours opening this Friday, you've been on General Hospital, you've done some highly regarded drama and some goofball comedy; what are you doing next? What's that you say? A multimedia presentation on Three's Company? Well, sure.

And finally: MTV has apologized to GLAAD for an episode of Jersey Shore that treated transgender people insensitively. The bad news is that this implies that MTV has no regrets about anything else about Jersey Shore. (Yes, that is the joke that is compelled by that piece of news. I deliver it not with excitement, but with resignation.)

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