Roundups

Morning Shots: A Struggling-Shows Update, And Why Garfield's Face Is Red

a cup of coffee
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Cinematical takes a look at seven movies that didn't deserve all the money they made in recent years.

It's often instructive to read the opinions of people who feel exactly the opposite way about something that you do; this Rolling Stone piece about Glee is striking for me personally because I disagree with almost every assertion it makes. But! That doesn't mean it isn't interesting.

Also in Rolling Stone news, Wenner Media (which publishes the magazine) is being sued in a class action claiming it engaged in what amounts to text-message spam — which, of course, costs money to the recipient.

Those who work for Disney can be fired for driving while texting if they do it in a company car or while on company business. Now, that's something Oprah could get behind.

Fans of Fox's comedy Running Wilde are getting nervous, and rightly so: the show has been pushed aside until November 30, which isn't a good sign about its future. The amazing pedigree — produced by and starring various folks associated with Arrested Development — just doesn't seem to have been enough to push it over the top.

On the other hand, NBC might have better luck with its wonderful Parks And Recreation if it would, you know, put it on television again. E! has this talk with creator Mike Schur, who's quite diplomatic about the way NBC pushed the show to midseason (to make room for the execrable Outsourced) and still hasn't given it a return date.

In still more TV news related to struggling shows, AMC canceled Rubicon yesterday.

I do not envy Jim Davis, the creator of Garfield, following what has to be one of the biggest inadvertent screw-ups in comic-scheduling history.

Vulture rounds up casting news for young actresses, noting that the same crop of them seems to find itself considered for all sorts of important roles.

There's also more Muppet-related casting news, which pulls in folks from the Apatow realm, from Community, from Glee ... well, read it for yourself.

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