Roundups

Morning Shots: Seth Meyers Gets A Big Job, And Susan Boyle Just Keeps Going

a cup of coffee
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This year's White House Correspondents' Association Dinner will be hosted by Saturday Night Live's Seth Meyers. It's not a daring choice, particularly, but Meyers is also less likely to (intentionally or inadvertently) make the evening into a narrative about himself, as has happened with guys like Stephen Colbert.

Peter Tolan, who co-created Rescue Me with Denis Leary and has written for television (The Larry Sanders Show, Murphy Brown and lots more) and for film (Analyze This), has gone public with his less-than-stellar review of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (which hands out the Golden Globes) as well as the Emmy process, which he thinks should be taken over by critics. (Note: language.)

Who's still standing, still making a splash, and predicted to top the Billboard 200 albums chart next week? Susan Boyle. She ain't over yet.

The New York Times takes a look at crossword construction with NPR's own puzzlemaster Will Shortz and others, including a group of students at Brown University.

ABC/Disney has a new deal in place to make more content available via Netflix streaming. Welcome, every episode of Scrubs!

Sometimes it's hard to believe we really deserve someone as consistently delightful as Helen Mirren, but she's back in the headlines of The Guardian again, having commented at an awards breakfast that she's had it with a Hollywood that "continues to worship at the altar of the 18-to-25-year-old male and his penis." (That story might also contain the best condensed URL of the day.) But lest you think she's just being entertaining, rest assured, she's serious: "I resent in my life the survival of some very mediocre male actors and the professional demise of some very brilliant female ones."

And finally — also from The Guardianthe butler really didn't do it very often, so where did we get that idea?

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