Roundups

Morning Shots: Plan To Drop Snooki Onto A Roof Is Tragically Scrapped

a cup of coffee
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On what will be our final morning roundup of 2010, please enjoy ... the fact that still, very little is happening during this week of rest between one holiday and another holiday.

Want to know how to win at Monopoly? Someone has done that math. Well, of course.

With the caveat that this includes the inflated ratings every show gets when it's new, Conan O'Brien is pulling more viewers in the 18-34 age range than anyone else in late night over his first six weeks, according to TBS. A big audience? Not necessarily — about 1.3 million viewers total. But an audience that other late-night talk shows have a hard time grabbing and keeping? Yes.

I do not in any way agree that Valentine's Day can reasonably be considered the year's worst rom-com when the year includes The Bounty Hunter, but there are some good choices on this list of lame things in the movies from 2010.

It has been a big few days for death hoaxes. What makes anyone think it's terribly clever to get a death hoax going on Twitter is very baffling to me, but if you suddenly see an outbreak of tweets that somebody is dead, please exercise extreme skepticism. (Especially, it seems, if they allegedly died snowboarding.)

No, MTV, you cannot drop Snooki in a ball on New Year's Eve. Oh, great. What am I going to do that night now?

Here is an article about a meeting of "boredom enthusiasts." If you're enthusiastic, though, how are you bored? This is a paradox, isn't it?

A sweet and poignant look in The New York Times at actors who are in Broadway shows that are soon to close. Hey, it's better than more bad news about Spider-Man.

And finally: I enjoy a lot of things that come from Discovery Communications, but I find it very difficult not to agree wholeheartedly with the condemnation of this gross Michael Jackson autopsy special that is apparently only airing in Europe.

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