I Will If You Will

The 'I Will If You Will' Book Club: Neil Gaiman's 'The Sandman: Dream Country'

The cover of The Sandman, Volume 3: Dream Country.

The cover of The Sandman, Volume 3: Dream Country. Vertigo/DC Comics hide caption

itoggle caption Vertigo/DC Comics

Forgive me.

When we went through our reader poll to choose our next book late last year, the plurality voted for a graphic novel, which I agreed to choose in consultation with Monkey See's own comic/graphic novel go-to guy, Glen Weldon.

Glen, unfortunately, is so considerate that he presented me with several options. This one was more fun, this one was more deep, this one was grittier, this one was lighter, this one is a little harder to get, this one is a little easier to get through. I, unfortunately, froze, feeling like any direction was going to make a lot of people unhappy, and what the book club is supposed to be about the most is enthusiasm and good cheer. (About whales and vampires.)

But now that I have let this go on for a couple of months, hoping that a resolution would suddenly come to me, it is time to just pick something already — and I am fairly sure that Glen himself is on board with this suggestion, based loosely on the number of times he has said to me, "Just pick something already."

So we're going with the highly regarded, reasonably accessible but still challenging, not too expensive, Neil Gaiman's The Sandman: Dream Country.

The good news is this: Glen is here to help lower the barrier to entry. I'm very confident that he will help us get to where we need to be in order to understand what's going on. You should be able to find the book relatively easily, particularly relative to other books, and we're going to give it plenty of time, so if you want to read along, get yourself a copy, and we'll get going in a week or so.

I bet you thought I forgot you! I didn't.

For those of you who don't know, the I Will If You Will Book Club began here at Monkey See as a way to read books we might otherwise not choose to tackle, whether because of their reputations or because they're a different style than we typically prefer, or whatever. We have gone both lowbrow (Twilight) and highbrow (Moby Dick). I have personally been really glad that I read both of those books, even though they were both difficult in their own unique, vampy, whale-anatomy-intensive ways.

This one shouldn't take as long as Moby-Dick, I can say that for sure. You can direct any questions, in the comments, to Glen, because I don't know much more than you do, but we'll all learn together.

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