Roundups

Morning Shots: Will Smith! Smell-o-vision! Zombie Makeup! Crying!

a cup of coffee
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The New York Times is asking readers to name their choices for the scariest films they've ever seen. I've said a billion times that mine is Audrey Hepburn in Wait Until Dark, but feel free to add your own.

ION Life (a channel that may or may not be on my cable system; I'm not sure) has announced a "green lifestyle series" called Alive & Well With Michelle Harris, which will show "the glamorous side of green living." Are they suggesting compost isn't glamorous?

"Will Smith To Make Rap Comeback." Discuss.

There's an "official plot synopsis" for Man Of Steel (Zack Snyder's upcoming Superman movie) floating around, and you can certainly read it for yourself, but I have to say, it reads to me like the plot of every story about Superman ever, including the '90s ABC series with Dean Cain. I'm not sure this is a plot synopsis so much as a character sketch of Superman.

Woody Allen's Midnight In Paris goes on and on — it's nowhere near new, but it's further expanding on August 26.

Many of the reservations I have about the movie One Day, which I haven't seen, and about the book One Day, which I couldn't stand, are confirmed in this impressive review from Tasha Robinson at the A.V. Club. It nails more of what I disliked about the book than I managed to explain when I read (and then flung) it.

It's true what one of our commenters said the other day: the fourth dimension in Spy Kids: All The Time In The World In 4D, really is smell, in the form of scratch-and-sniff cards.

The Walking Dead makeup is really creepy — it doesn't take a genius to figure that out. But I still enjoyed this Deadline peek at the Emmy-nominated makeup guy, Greg Nicotero.

Virgin Atlantic wants you to know that some films may make you cry. Like My Sister's Keeper, which: sure. And Just Go With It with Adam Sandler, which ... I'm sorry, what?

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