Roundups

Morning Shots: Earthquake Feuds, Media Critics, And Creepy Burger King

Seen here working the Super Bowl in 2006, the Burger King mascot has finally worn out his welcome. i i

Seen here working the Super Bowl in 2006, the Burger King mascot has finally worn out his welcome. Evan Agostini/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Evan Agostini/Getty Images
Seen here working the Super Bowl in 2006, the Burger King mascot has finally worn out his welcome.

Seen here working the Super Bowl in 2006, the Burger King mascot has finally worn out his welcome.

Evan Agostini/Getty Images

The apparent demise of the Burger King mascot we'll call Plasto-King led Time to put together a slideshow of the 10 creepiest product mascots. Some good choices there.

GigaOm, meanwhile, has put together an infographic that examines some telling statistics about Netflix.

U.S. television is not alone in having trouble finding a durable stand-up comedy competition show: The Guardian says the one that's concluding in the U.K. right now has been — take it away, sharp-toothed critic! — "an abject, miserable failure."

Mike Fleiss, producer of The Bachelor and The Bachelorette (among other projects), has signed on to direct a "low-budget horror film." Or, as fans of his previous work will call it, "another low-budget horror film."

HBO passed on its last project for Diane Keaton, a project about a Hollywood blogger who reminded many of Deadline Hollywood's Nikki Finke. But she's signed a fresh development deal with the network that may result in something else that will actually make it to air.

Yahoo! put together a little story about the back-and-forth between the East and West coasts about our earthquake the other day. (I hold to what I tweeted Tuesday and now shamelessly recycle: You'll excuse me if I can only laugh about being mocked for disliking the feeling of an entire building shaking by people who attached the suffix "mageddon" to the word "car.")

Layoffs at Slate yesterday hit some of the site's most recognized names, including media critic Jack Shafer and Chatterbox writer Timothy Noah, along with Juliet Lapidos and foreign editor June Thomas. Yikes.

If you follow media and news criticism, the name Jim Romenesko is likely a part of your vocabulary. Yesterday, Romenesko announced that he would be "semi-retiring" from his blog at Poynter.org, which will continue to be written by other contributors.

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