Roundups

Morning Shots: Patton Oswalt May Be Hating Everything Less These Days

Patton Oswalt is the subject of a new and searching interview at the A.V. Club. i i

Patton Oswalt is the subject of a new and searching interview at the A.V. Club. Mike Lawrie/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mike Lawrie/Getty Images
Patton Oswalt is the subject of a new and searching interview at the A.V. Club.

Patton Oswalt is the subject of a new and searching interview at the A.V. Club.

Mike Lawrie/Getty Images

Potentially significant comedy news: Bill Lawrence, the creator of Scrubs and Cougar Town, is one of the producers of a workplace comedy project that just sold to CBS. It's interesting to contemplate Lawrence's offbeat sensibility as part of CBS's very staid comedy style — he's one of the big pioneers in single-camera shows without audible laughter, and CBS has clung more stubbornly to multi-camera, laugh-filled shows than any other network, and this one will be multicam also — but at least he's a sharply creative guy, so who knows?

The HBO pilot Da Brick, directed by Spike Lee and written by John Ridley, has picked a lead, and it's Attack The Block's John Boyega.

Didn't get enough of the George Lucas/Return Of The Jedi business yesterday? Well, folks are picking apart Congressional testimony he gave in 1988 in support of protecting filmmakers from having their work changed by others, arguing that it's somehow hypocritical to then be a filmmaker who changes his own work. I don't think it holds water any more than arguing that other people can't break in and paint your house means you can't paint your own house, but decide for yourself.

Some news is like a Mad Lib, in that it's easier for me to just sit back and let you make your own jokes, since I know you're going to anyway. To wit: Sting is performing at the Beacon Theater in New York in October to celebrate 25 years of Sting solo albums. For the record, I think that guy has done some pretty serviceable pop records, as ponderous and insufferable as I know it is possible to argue they have become.

Even if there weren't many reasons to read Alan Sepinwall's interview with Parks And Recreation's Nick Offerman, I would recommend it for this quote alone: "I am merely the mugging, ham-fisted monkey that they hired to be the vessel for their amazing writing." Hey, I'm a mugging, ham-fisted monkey also! I knew that guy and I would get along.

Speaking of interviews, when I initially saw that the A.V. Club had talked to Patton Oswalt, I shared with ... well, with Patton Oswalt ... the sense that perhaps he couldn't possibly have anything new to say to him, since he's pretty much the Official Cool Comedian Of The A.V. Club. And yet, his interview with them is pretty great, and I think the fact that much territory has already been covered means that each interview gets — in the good sense — more ordinary, meaning you hear more things you haven't heard from him before while he's exclusively promoting something. His comments about transitioning out of, and learning to resist, instinctive cynicism about every new thing, are instructive. In any event, it's well worth reading.

AdFreak has an interesting story about an advertisement depicting a woman with a black eye being given a diamond necklace by a man who appears to be her partner. This weird juxtaposition of violence and romantic trappings is giving people the creeps, and the salon owner can't seem to decide whether she's sorry for it or not. (Mostly not.) Check out the details and the ad.

And finally: Super-buff giant shirtless dude Dwayne "The Artist Formerly Known As The Rock" Johnson has, according to The Hollywood Reporter, been offered the role of Goliath opposite somewhat less buff, somewhat less giant, but also frequently shirtless dude Taylor Lautner as David. So David was apparently not so much small as small-er.

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