Roundups

Morning Shots: Authors Take To Twitter To Support Short Stories

Author Neil Gaiman, seen here in 2009, is among the authors rallying to support radio broadcasts of short stories. i

Author Neil Gaiman, seen here in 2009, is among the authors rallying to support radio broadcasts of short stories. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Neilson Barnard/Getty Images
Author Neil Gaiman, seen here in 2009, is among the authors rallying to support radio broadcasts of short stories.

Author Neil Gaiman, seen here in 2009, is among the authors rallying to support radio broadcasts of short stories.

Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

BBC Radio 4 has announced plans to cut back on its broadcasting of short stories, and authors are not happy. This has led to a nifty Twitter project — which will be either really cool or a completely chaotic mess — in which a short story is essentially crowdsourced on social media. Participating authors include Twitter superstar Neil Gaiman, so you know it's serious.

I'll have more to say about this later today, but over at Hitfix, Dan Fienberg's takedown of the new CW show H8R is an exquisite piece of cultural criticism you should read immediately, whether that show — perhaps just from its title — sounds like the biggest pile of horsepucky you've ever heard of or not.

Several stars of the soon-to-depart All My Children are making appearances on a daytime talk show to talk about food. But if you think they are showing their faces on The Chew, the food chat show replacing AMC on ABC, you're quite wrong. They're jumping over to CBS to make appearances on The Talk. That is, it seems to me, a pointed maneuver. Yow.

Last fall, we brought you Ann Widdecombe, an unlikely success story on Strictly Come Dancing, the UK's precursor to Dancing With The Stars. But now, The Guardian reports that she's not so high on the current participants, who are "silly" or "frumpy." She would never!

In blockbuster sequel news, Slashfilm rounds up the skinny about J.J. Abrams officially signing on for Star Trek 2.

Cinemablend has today's random but interesting list: Funny actors who have gone mean. In some cases, they've gone very, very mean.

On a recent episode of our podcast, Pop Culture Happy Hour, we talked about guest actors we are always happy to see, and one of them was Rachael Harris. As if Hollywood heard us, there is now news that Harris will have a guest arc on NBC's Free Agents, the Hank Azaria-Kathryn Hahn comedy that premieres tonight.

Yesterday, we showed you Hitfix's infographic of repeat Emmy losers in comedy. Today, they're doing the drama side. Poor Angela Lansbury, yeesh.

Chuck Lorre still isn't talking about the events surrounding Charlie Sheen's exit from Two And A Half Men (litigation is ongoing, you see), but he will talk to TV Guide about the revamped show as it will return soon with Ashton Kutcher, who Lorre admits is a choice he took a while to warm up to.

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