The Headline From NY Fashion Week: Print(s) Is Not Dead

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    At New York Fashion Week, Christian Cota opted out of a runway show and instead offered a presentation, displaying pieces that evoked sea life and bioluminescent colors.
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    Costello Tagliapietra showed satiny, structured dresses in earthy colors and prints.
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    Jason Wu, a favorite of First Lady Michelle Obama, offered his take on the trend of pattern: here, a dress awash in a watercolor of dots.
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    Joseph Altuzarra worked a floral print into a narrowly tailored jacket and pants, sharply set off against black.
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    Alexander Wang made a statement with laser-cut mesh pockets and layers of bold color.
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    A sheer cover-up over a bright blue swim suit offers another take at layering, also courtesy Alexander Wang.
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    DKNY models strutted in front of New York taxis, which played up the vivid red-and-blue floral that was painted on everything from head to toe.
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    Nanette Lepore offered a feminine, layered look, with lace topping a strong tangerine day dress.
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    Marc By Marc Jacobs played with pattern — here, on a 1940s style swim suit.
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    Theyskens' Theory played with proportions. Pants have a slight sag – and swagger.
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    Rag & Bone played with layers, showing a neon bikini under a gauzy skirt and crocheted tank.
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Today's the last day of New York Fashion Week, that twice-yearly ritual at which retailers and editors give us a look at what we're going to be craving in spring. Big this year: prints. Whimsical prints.

To get a bead on what looks like a swing back away from minimalism, Morning Edition guest host David Greene talks to Sally Singer, editor-in-chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine.

"A woman only needs so many pairs of chic black pants," Singer says. "Or so many cream jackets. What does she need now? She needs a dress covered in birds — or that's what the [retailers] hope."

There's more on that — and on how the urge to stay fashion-forward might conflict with fears that the economy might soon be moving in reverse — in the audio above.

And in that photo gallery, courtesy of my colleague Nina Gregory out at NPR West, there's just shy of a dozen examples of work from designers Singer says are addressing a whole new generation of fashionistas — and who have "the capacity and the drive" to be the next gang of Tommys and Calvins and Ralphs.

Go on, look at 'em full-screen. You know you wanna.

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