Roundups

Morning Shots: The Unnerving Whitney Cummings And The Comforting Muppets

Whitney Cummings speaks at the summer 2011 Television Critics Association press tour in August 2011. i i

hide captionWhitney Cummings speaks at the summer 2011 Television Critics Association press tour in August 2011.

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images
Whitney Cummings speaks at the summer 2011 Television Critics Association press tour in August 2011.

Whitney Cummings speaks at the summer 2011 Television Critics Association press tour in August 2011.

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

If you only read one piece of cultural criticism today that you don't find at NPR, make it this terrific column by Emily Nussbaum in The New Yorker. It's Emily's debut as their TV critic, and it explains better than I have why Whitney Cummings is, as Emily quite brilliantly puts it in the first sentence, "this year's most unnerving success."

Do you still care about literary feuds? The Guardian has you covered, as it not only covers a new writer-critic smackdown, but also classifies feuds by type, including the Row-Literary, the Feud-Personal, and the Vendetta-Visceral.

NPR's Susan Stamberg visiting The Muppets? Yes, please.

I am a sucker for the witty, blunt, always insightful Anthony Bourdain, and the long-form interview format they use at The A.V. Club is the perfect venue in which to enjoy him.

Stephen Sondheim's new book, Look, I Made A Hat, is excerpted in The Guardian, where he reveals that he doesn't care about critics and doesn't think artists should write for them. (I agree, and also believe it's equally important that critics not write for artists or worry about what artists think about the importance of criticism.)

New Bruce Springsteen album! You may now be glad.

Remember when Mila Kunis said she would go to the Marine Corps Ball with the guy who asked her? Well, she went, and there are pictures. That's pretty cool.

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