Roundups

Morning Shots: 'Fahrenheit 451' Goes Digital, And Ang Lee Has 'Hulk' Thoughts

Ray Bradbury, seen here in 2009, has allowed the publication of Fahrenheit 451 as a digital book for the first time. i i

Ray Bradbury, seen here in 2009, has allowed the publication of Fahrenheit 451 as a digital book for the first time. Vince Bucci/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Vince Bucci/Getty Images
Ray Bradbury, seen here in 2009, has allowed the publication of Fahrenheit 451 as a digital book for the first time.

Ray Bradbury, seen here in 2009, has allowed the publication of Fahrenheit 451 as a digital book for the first time.

Vince Bucci/Getty Images

The Hollywood Reporter has the story of the first British Film Festival in Kurdistani Iraq, which faced a few interesting challenges — like a complete lack of movie theaters. (Note: I saw The First Movie, mentioned in this article, at Silverdocs over the summer, and because it's about bringing film to a place that didn't previously have it, I'm glad they were able to show it at this fest and not at all surprised that it did well there. It's lovely.)

Ray Bradbury has never had very many nice things to say about e-books or the Internet but now, facing a situation where he wasn't able to get a contract that didn't include e-book rights, he's made Fahrenheit 451 available as an e-book for the first time.

The New York Film Critics Circle gave out its 2011 awards yesterday, determined to get the jump on everybody else by not even waiting for December to wrap up the films of the year. It's best feature: The Artist, a silent film saluting the silent era.

While the Publishers Weekly blog post on the worst book in the world is a little overly reliant on the image of women eating alone as tragic, I can give it a pass, because it's a pretty funny collection of Amazon reviews.

The Washington Post reports on older FBI agents who are not at all happy about the portrayal of J. Edgar Hoover in Clint Eastwood's new biopic.

It's possible that the most randomly delightful thing I've read in the last week is this interview with director Ang Lee, who says that he wasn't as blown away by the cosmos stuff in Terrence Malick's Tree Of Life, because he basically thought about putting the same stuff in The Hulk. Oh, it's true, all right.

A piece arguing that Twilight has an advantage over Star Wars might seem like total click-bait and fight-bait, and it kind of is. But this piece in Vulture is also actually quite thoughtful — and quite right — about the point it's making regarding female characters.

The first Broadway musical of the 2010-11 season to make back its money? The Book Of Mormon.

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