Roundups

Morning Shots: Harry Potter Goes Digital, And 'Bully' Goes Without A Rating

a cup of coffee
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As our friends at NPR's Two-Way blog mentioned yesterday afternoon, the Weinstein Company has decided to release Bully without a rating following the controversy that flared when the MPAA assigned it an R, rather than a PG-13, based on language. As I've mentioned, giving the film an R rating seems very odd to me, and even more so after seeing the PG-13 The Hunger Games.

A press release outlining the promotional partners for the upcoming release of Battleship (that's the movie, "based on" the game) might seem like a ho-hum thing, but parts of it are actually kind of amusing and perplexing. Sure, you've got your Coke Zero and your Chevron and your Subway. But don't forget your ... Hilton Hotels? Take note, too, that the U.S. Navy and the USO are both on board, so to speak. [Deadline]

In its first week of availability, how many people listened online to the This American Life episode retracting their Mike Daisey Apple episode? Well, a lot. More than any other episode has grabbed in that first week, including the original Daisey episode. [Nieman Journalism Lab]

In a different twist on Mad Men fever, one writer for The Guardian doesn't have any way of seeing the show for quite a while, and doesn't plan to shell out extra money just to get the right service to see it. What to do until then? "I suggest occupying oneself with a new hobby, or more aptly, going on a prolonged bender." [The Guardian]

The host for the next Emmy Awards will be Jimmy Kimmel, and while I have found him not my cup of tea at times, Kimmel's ability to get people to do silly things is right up there with Jimmy Fallon's, so I wouldn't be surprised to see him turn out to be quite a fine host. [HitFix]

At last: Harry Potter e-books are available at the Pottermore web site. That one took a while. [NYT]

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