Roundups

Morning Shots: Reading This Roundup, Pursued By A Bear

a cup of coffee
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Today in great fun: a look at the execution of difficult stage directions, such as — but not limited to — "Exit, pursued by a bear." [The Guardian]

It's safe to say that if you find yourself on the new Lifetime show My Life Is A Lifetime Movie, something has gone wrong. [Crushable]

This is what happens when book people get upset: the Justice Department has received so much feedback on its proposed settlement over e-book price fixing that it's asking for permission not to print all the letters. The many, many letters. [GalleyCat]

It's kind of sad to look at just how high Broadway ticket prices have gotten and just how out of reach they are for anybody who isn't willing to throw around a lot of money. [The Atlantic via Andrew Sullivan]

Bethenny Frankel's new talk show missed a regular pickup, but it's getting a tryout, and so far, the signs are reasonably good. She really never gives up on anything, that one. [Deadline]

Disclaimer: I am not part of the couple-of-years-old Broadcast Television Journalists Association (which is different from the much older Television Critics Association, which I am part of), so I don't know exactly what they're getting at, but to me, giving awards to pilots that haven't even aired yet is deeply and profoundly weird. I realize that it's important to draw attention to the good stuff that's coming up, but to paraphrase Don Draper, that's what the writing is for. [The Hollywood Reporter]

Kim Masters has a juicy report on the problems behind the scenes at the upcoming zombie movie World War Z, described by one source as "a nightmare from top to bottom." [The Hollywood Reporter]

For some reason, I can't look away from this goofy lawsuit over Big Brother and Glass House (perhaps I am startled that anyone would want to claim creative ownership of either one), and if you can't either, here's the latest. [E! Online]

Two pieces of casting news: Hugh Laurie in the new Robocop, and Portia de Rossi as the new Lily Munster. [Vulture/Vulture]

I encourage you to read, and see if you can parse, this piece that seemingly praises the boldness of films that don't have fantasy elements — in which category Rock Of Ages is included. It appears that in this piece, films taking place in space and films taking place in France are the same as each other, and both Rock Of Ages and the male stripper movie Magic Mike count as "realistic stories about recognizable characters." [The New York Times]

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