Roundups

Culture Yourself: October 15, 2012

In the tradition of forgotten features returning from the dead, please welcome back Culture Yourself, an afternoon post wrapping up some of our arts and culture coverage you might have missed.

Today's All Things Considered features an interview with John Hawkes, who was in Winter's Bone and Martha Marcy May Marlene, and whose new movie, The Sessions, is (just my two cents) terrific.

Over at NPR Music, you can see a video visit with David Byrne and St. Vincent as they rehearse for their tour together. It's part of their In Practice series (get it?), which is worth checking out.

Tyler Perry talked about his career and his new movie, in which he takes over the role of James Patterson's Alex Cross, on Fresh Air.

Morning Edition saluted the 60th anniversary of Charlotte's Web with a piece carrying the seriously great headline, "Some Book!" And Susan Stamberg looked at a Roy Lichtenstein retrospective at the National Gallery of Art.

There's a special note for fans of the Sandwich Monday feature from the old Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me! Blog, which is that it's moved over to our food blog, The Salt, where today, they looked at ... the Candwich. Yeeee-uck.

Also one thing from the weekend: if you didn't get a chance to hear Bob Mondello's story about how the debates are like reality shows, it's well worth a listen. And it's a great example of a story you should really try to hear, not just read.

I also try to help point you to stories from your local station from time to time, and while it's a few days old, I was fascinated by Brian Lehrer's interview on WNYC about the very weird saga of the Broadway production of Rebecca that recently went kablooey. And from my former adopted hometown, Minnesota Public Radio has a story about the state of drive-in movie theaters. (This is also a great way to hear some legit Minnesota accents. I don't know why I forget that during moments when I need comfort.)

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