Daily News Digest

Headlines: Teenagers Charged In Immigrant's Death

Mexican's Death Bares a Town's Ethnic Tension
Four teenagers in Shenandoah, Pa., have been charged in the death of Luis Ramirez, an illegal Mexican immigrant, who was beaten to death weeks ago. Ramirez's death has illuminated conflicts in the town that surprise local officials, who claim that local ordinances promoting discrimination against illegal immigrants in hiring and renting policies have nothing to do with the area's climate of increasing ethnic tension.

Hunger is Once Again Stalking Ethiopia
Rising food prices along with drought combine to form a new hunger crisis that is reminiscent of 1984 famine that killed almost one million people. Oddly, Ethiopia couldn't look greener right now, but children are still dying from malnutrition right and left. The Ethiopian government claims that the situation can only get better.

Up From Chicago
The term "uppity," a word the McCain campaign has used to describe Barack Obama, has a history of being used to refer to "Negroes who didn't know their place." By using terms like this to paint Obama as arrogant, the campaign may be pandering to voters who think maybe Obama doesn't know his place either.

Lawyer Says Detainee Aided US in Afghanistan
The military lawyer for Salim Hamdan, Osama bin Laden's driver and the first Guantanamo detainee to challenge his detention since the Supreme Court ruling in June, claims Hamdan offered important information to U.S. forces to aid them in Afghanistan. Hamdan is charged with providing material support for terrorism and conspiracy; if convicted he may serve a life term, but even if he is acquitted, he will likely remain in custody as an enemy combatant until the definitive end of the war on terror.

Obama Calls for Tapping into Strategic Oil Reserves
As gasoline prices continue to rise, Barack Obama attempts to appease angry voters by changing his position and calling for the U.S. to tap into its Strategic Petroleum Reserve. His campaign released a statement saying that the "doubling of oil prices in the past year is a crisis for millions of Americans." This announcement came just a few days after he said that he would consider some forms of off-shore drilling.

Gas Prices Decline for 7th Week
For the seventh week in a row, the price of gasoline is still on a downward trend, creating hope for more relief for consumers at the pump. The average price for a gallon of self-serve regular gas has gone down by 7.5 cents to $3.88, the lowest it has been since May 19th. The California average has gone down by 11.2 cents to $4.205.

Entertainment
The Comforts of Hip-Hop Past
Rock the Bells, a yearly hip-hop event that's become a staple of the summer tour circuit, this year neglected much of the regular radio rap and featured instead a diverse lineup of the genre's innovators. Artists like the Pharcyde and A Tribe Called Quest were reunited this summer for some of their first performances in decades, and others, like De La Soul, Method Man and Redman, brought out friends and collaborators.

Being a Thug Ain't Smart, It Ain't Chic, It Ain't Etiquette
New MTV reality show, From G's to Gents, claims to spur the transformation of thuggish men into gentlemen, offering the series winner a $100,000 prize, but seems to encourage exactly the "G"-type behavior that won the contestants their spots in the first place. Individuals are sent home if it appears they are less in need of help than their co-competitors, who taunt the losers for having real jobs and homes.

Morgan Freeman 'In Good Spirits' After Car Accident
Oscar winning actor Morgan Freeman broke his arm and his elbow in a car accident in Mississippi. Spokeswoman Donna Lee says he is in "good spirits" and "is having a little bit of surgery this afternoon or tomorrow to help correct the damage." The 71-year-old actor was apparently lucid and joking with medical professionals as they extracted him from his car with the "Jaws of Life" and airlifted him to a hospital in Tennessee.

Sports
Out of the Limelight, but Still Running Hard
Gary Kikaya, an Olympic runner from the Democratic Republic of Congo, says "it's not just supposed to be about a gold medal." Kikaya, who lived briefly with Justin Gatlin, a 2004 gold medalist who tested positive for a banned substance, understands the nightmarish pressure on Olympic athletes from America and China, and is thankful his country is just happy to send him to Beijing.

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At times when I've heard local officials promoting such ordinances I've been struck by their complacent and unselfconscious enjoyment of how good it feels to have an outgroup to blame. They believe they're dealing with a serious issue worthy of attention and don't notice the shrunken motivations driving them to pay attention to it and turn it into an issue.

But I'm pretty sure like minded people pick up on it, including those with fewer inhibitions...

Paul - originalfaith.com

Sent by Paul Maurice Martin | 11:51 PM | 8-5-2008

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