Berlin Event

'Caesar Must Die' Wins Top Honor At The Berlinale

 Italian directors Vittorio, right, and Paolo Taviani were awarded the Golden Bear prize for their film Caesar Must Die (Cesare Deve Morire) this weekend. i i

hide caption Italian directors Vittorio, right, and Paolo Taviani were awarded the Golden Bear prize for their film Caesar Must Die (Cesare Deve Morire) this weekend.

Andreas Rentz/Getty Images
 Italian directors Vittorio, right, and Paolo Taviani were awarded the Golden Bear prize for their film Caesar Must Die (Cesare Deve Morire) this weekend.

Italian directors Vittorio, right, and Paolo Taviani were awarded the Golden Bear prize for their film Caesar Must Die (Cesare Deve Morire) this weekend.

Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

"Caesar Must Die," the film by Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, won the top prize - the Golden Bear - for best film at the 62nd Berlinale.

Mostly shot in black and white, the filmmaker brothers document the performance of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar by inmates of the Roman high security prison, Rebibbia.

The filmmakers spent six months following rehearsals of the stage production in prison.

Their documentary doesn't dwell on the crimes of the inmates. Rather, it shows how their personal hopes and fears resonate in the performance of Shakespeare's play about friendship and betrayal, power and violence.

Accepting the prize with his brother, Paolo Taviani, 80, says, "We hope that when the film is released to the general public, that cinema-goers will say to themselves, or even those around them...that even a prisoner with a dreadful sentence, even a life sentence, is, and remains, a human being."

German director Christian Petzold holds the Silver Bear for Best Director he received for the film Barbara this past Saturday. i i

hide captionGerman director Christian Petzold holds the Silver Bear for Best Director he received for the film Barbara this past Saturday.

Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images
German director Christian Petzold holds the Silver Bear for Best Director he received for the film Barbara this past Saturday.

German director Christian Petzold holds the Silver Bear for Best Director he received for the film Barbara this past Saturday.

Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images

The Jury Grand Prix-Silver Bear went to Bence Fliegauf's Just the Wind. His film is based on an actual series of killings of a Romany family in a Hungarian village.

German filmmaker Christian Petzold received a Silver Bear for best director. His drama, Barbara, is about an East German doctor plotting her escape to join her lover in West Germany.

The 15 year-old Rachel Mwanza was awarded the Silver Bear for best actress for her portrayal of a forced child soldier in War Witch.

The film, shot on location in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is told from the perspective of an adolescent girl. It visualizes the horrors of civil war and the suffering of children and civilians. Rachel Mwanza was living on the streets of Kinshasa before Canadian filmmaker, Kim Nguyen, discovered her.

Denmark's Mikkel Boe Folsgaard won the Silver Bear for best actor.

YouTube

A Royal Affair Trailer

He plays mad king Christian VII in the costume drama A Royal Affair, which also won best screenplay.

French-Swiss director Ursula Meier won a special Silver Bear for Sister, a story of the struggles of two siblings at the fringe of society set against the backdrop of a popular tourist destination in the Alps.

Portuguese director Miguel Gomes received the Alfred Bauer Prize for his black and white film Tabu. The Alfred Bauer Prize is awarded for new directions in cinema. Gomez playfully interprets and rearranges historical events. His film stretches from modern day Lisbon to a former Portuguese colony.

Three hundred thousand tickets were sold to the public at this year's Berlinale. The festival's new venue in the Haus der Berliner Festspiele on Scharperstrasse opened with Angelina Jolie's directorial debut In The Land Of Blood And Honey.

Another highlight of the festival was the awarding of the Honorary Golden Bear to Meryl Streep for lifetime achievement.

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