Parallels Many Stories, One World

Members of the Muslim community leave the East London Mosque after prayers before the start of the holy month of Ramadan in June 2014. The mosque has an estimated 7,000 worshippers. Rob Stothard/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Rob Stothard/Getty Images

Workers stand next to a gas pipeline not far from the central Ukrainian city of Poltava in June 2014. Ukraine imports much of its gas from Russia, which is once again threatening to cut off supplies in a dispute over payments. Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images

In Gett, the character Viviane Ansalem wants a divorce but her husband will not give permission. In Israel, if you're Jewish, even if you're not religious, you have to be divorced by Jewish law. Courtesy Music Box Films hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy Music Box Films

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Muslim men attend Friday prayers at La Pau Islamic Center in Tarragona, a Mediterranean coastal town where Muslims comprise about 10 percent of the population. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Lauren Frayer/NPR

Then-U.S. ambassador to Iraq Christopher Hill (right) tours the Mosul Museum of History in May 2009. This week the self-declared Islamic State posted a video online that showed militants going through the museum, pushing over statues and smashing artifacts with sledgehammers. Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images

Earlier this month, Dr. Sadiqu al-Mousllie, accompanied by his family and a few members of their mosque, stood in downtown Braunschweig, Germany, and held up signs that read: "I am a Moslem. What would you like to know?" in an effort to promote dialogue between Muslims and non-Muslims. Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie

Construction workers at the Erbil Citadel, which was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site last year. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ari Shapiro/NPR

Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images

Lina Ejeilat helped found the Jordanian online magazine 7iber (pronounced 'Hebber'). While the government encourages free expression in principle, many strict regulations remain, as noted by the satirical chart next to her. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Art Silverman/NPR

Saudi women, shown here at a cultural festival near the capital Riyadh on Sunday, still need the permission of male relatives to travel and even receive certain medical procedures, but a growing number are entering the workforce. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Jordanians marched in the streets of the capital Amman on Feb. 6 to show solidarity with the family of a pilot killed by the Islamic State in Syria. Jordanians also expressed support for the king's decision to take part in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS. Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov

Jordanian soldiers stand guard at the Iraq-Jordan border last year. Jordan also shares a border with Syria and has had to deal with a flood of refugees from both its neighbors over the past decade. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov

On Sunday, thousands of people gathered in Maidan to mark the first anniversary of anti-government demonstrations that left scores of protesters dead. Geovien So/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Geovien So/Barcroft Media/Landov

An Iraqi child who fled fighting between the so-called Islamic State and Kurdish peshmerga is among the some 3,000 people living at the Baharka camp, near Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish autonomous region in northern Iraq, on Jan. 16. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

Kurdish Peshmerga fighters take positions on the outskirts of Mosul on Jan. 26. The U.S. military says an offensive to drive the Islamic State out of Mosul is expected around April or May. Azad Lashkari/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Azad Lashkari/Reuters /Landov

A worker at Soulis Furs in Kastoria sorts through treated mink pelts. "We buy the pelts — minks or foxes or other animals — from North America and Scandinavia and send them for treatment in factories or abroad," says Makis Gioras of Soulis Furs in Kastoria. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Indonesian President Joko Widodo inspects an honor guard during a visit to Manila, Philippines, on Feb. 9. Widodo's supporters see him as very different from the strongmen who have long run Indonesia. But he has dismayed some of his backers with his strong support of the death penalty. Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images

Training at a new camp near the front line, a mix of Arabs and Kurds prepare for an assault on Mosul in upcoming months. The men will wear balaclavas to conceal their identities while they fight, because they have family in Mosul and don't want to put their relatives at risk. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ari Shapiro/NPR

Saudi Arabia's Prince Turki al-Faisal, shown in 2013 in Bahrain, says the 'pinpricks' against the Islamic State have not been effective. The former intelligence chief also says the campaign needs to be better coordinated. Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty hide caption

itoggle caption Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty

Iranian Jewish men read from the Torah scroll during morning prayers at Youssef Abad Synagogue in Tehran in 2013. Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

Lebanese-born Rula Ghani is Afghanistan's first lady. The wife of newly elected Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has her own office in the presidential palace and intends to play a prominent role in public life. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Jan/NPR

People ride a horse and carriage through Isfahan's central square in June 2014. With its immense mosques, picturesque bridges and ancient bazaar, the city is a virtual living museum of Iranian traditional culture and is a top tourist destination. After decades of difficult relations with the West, Iran now says it wants more foreign tourists, including Westerners. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images