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Many Stories, One World

American journalist Ned Parker (foreground) is the Reuters bureau chief in Baghdad. He fled Iraq last week after receiving threats in response to reports on human rights abuses by Shiite militias allied with Iraq's government. He's shown here at Iraq's Foreign Ministry in 2007. Courtesy of Ned Parker hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Ned Parker

The ground floor walls of the Otaish family's home are gone and the rest of the house is also bombed out, but they have decided to live in what's left of it. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Harris/NPR

Iraqi security forces and allied Shiite militiamen look for Islamic State extremists in Tikrit on Tuesday. Iraqi forces were going house-to-house in search of snipers and booby traps. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Khalid Mohammed/AP

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State police officers patrol a highway between Ciudad Victoria and Matamoros, in northeast Mexico, in 2011. Mexico's drug and turf wars have descended on the once tourist friendly border town of Matamoros. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alexandre Meneghini/AP

People examine the rubble following an air strike near the airport in Yemen's capital Sanaa on Thursday. Saudi Arabia said it carried out bombing raids in neighboring Yemen as Houthi rebels, allied with Iran, continued their offensive in the country. Yemen's president fled the country Wednesday and was reported to be in Saudi Arabia on Thursday. Khaled Abdullah/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Khaled Abdullah/Reuters/Landov

Kurdish peshmerga fighters keep watch during the battle with Islamic State militants on the outskirts of Mosul on Jan. 21. Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Azad Lashkari/Reuters/Landov

Shiite fighters and Sunni fighters, who have joined Shiite militia groups known collectively as Hashid Shaabi ("Popular Mobilization") to fight the Islamic State, gesture Tuesday next to former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's palaces in the Iraqi town of Ouja, near Tikrit. Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters/Landov

A Ukrainian serviceman walks in the village of Pisky in the region of Donetsk controlled by Ukrainian forces on Feb. 26. Oleksandr Ratushniak/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Oleksandr Ratushniak/AFP/Getty Images

A photo from the wedding of Ahmed Shehata and Shaimaa Daif shows friends of the couple mocking members of the so-called Islamic State. Shehata says he staged the surprise to show his wife that ISIS was "something to laugh at, not to fear." Courtesy of Ahmed Shehata hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Ahmed Shehata

These pop-up targets are part of an advanced drill, named "friend or foe," that tests shooter reaction times. Some targets have a camera, and others, like these pictured, have a gun. The shooter must decide within seconds whether to shoot. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Deborah Amos/NPR

The most recent propaganda videos from Boko Haram have higher production values than in the past and other similarities to ISIS-produced videos. Boko Haram/Sendvid hide caption

itoggle caption Boko Haram/Sendvid

Workers stand next to a gas pipeline not far from the central Ukrainian city of Poltava in June 2014. Ukraine imports much of its gas from Russia, which is once again threatening to cut off supplies in a dispute over payments. Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images

Then-U.S. ambassador to Iraq Christopher Hill (right) tours the Mosul Museum of History in May 2009. This week the self-declared Islamic State posted a video online that showed militants going through the museum, pushing over statues and smashing artifacts with sledgehammers. Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images

Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images

Jordanian soldiers stand guard at the Iraq-Jordan border last year. Jordan also shares a border with Syria and has had to deal with a flood of refugees from both its neighbors over the past decade. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/Landov

An Iraqi child who fled fighting between the so-called Islamic State and Kurdish peshmerga is among the some 3,000 people living at the Baharka camp, near Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish autonomous region in northern Iraq, on Jan. 16. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

Kurdish Peshmerga fighters take positions on the outskirts of Mosul on Jan. 26. The U.S. military says an offensive to drive the Islamic State out of Mosul is expected around April or May. Azad Lashkari/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Azad Lashkari/Reuters /Landov

Training at a new camp near the front line, a mix of Arabs and Kurds prepare for an assault on Mosul in upcoming months. The men will wear balaclavas to conceal their identities while they fight, because they have family in Mosul and don't want to put their relatives at risk. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ari Shapiro/NPR

Saudi Arabia's Prince Turki al-Faisal, shown in 2013 in Bahrain, says the 'pinpricks' against the Islamic State have not been effective. The former intelligence chief also says the campaign needs to be better coordinated. Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty hide caption

itoggle caption Mohammed Al-Shaikh/AFP/Getty

Lebanese-born Rula Ghani is Afghanistan's first lady. The wife of newly elected Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has her own office in the presidential palace and intends to play a prominent role in public life. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Jan/NPR

Relatives of Egyptian Coptic Christians purportedly murdered in Libya by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants mourn for those killed. Mohamed el-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mohamed el-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images

Before ISIS attacked it, the northern Iraqi town of Snuny had a population of nearly 150,000 — a mix of Kurdish Muslims and Yazidis, who belong to a religious ethnic minority in this region. Only about 10,000 have returned after Kurdish fighters reclaimed the city. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ari Shapiro/NPR