ParallelsParallels

Many Stories, One World

A young boy runs past graffiti that's supportive of the self-declared Islamic State in a neighborhood in Ceuta. Analysts say a mix of religion, poverty and isolation have made Ceuta fertile ground for recruitment by the Islamic State. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Lauren Frayer for NPR

Dr. Awad Al-Yami, an art therapist trained at the University of Pennsylvania, is a counselor at a Saudi Arabian center that seeks to rehabilitate convicted terrorists. The center claims a success rate of more than 80 percent, but acknowledges that some return to extremist groups like al-Qaida. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Deborah Amos/NPR

Cholita, an Andean bear, was abused in a circus in Peru and is now in a small zoo. An animal welfare group has now received permission to take Cholita to a wildlife sanctuary in Colorado, along with more than 30 former circus lions. Courtesy of Animal Defenders International hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Animal Defenders International

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A baby orangutan wearing a diaper swings through the trees at the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program outside Medan, capital of Indonesia's North Sumatra province. The program takes mostly orphaned orangutans, nurses them back to health and releases them back into the wild. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Shlomy Mizrahi, an Israeli real estate agent, stands near a sign at the entrance to a Palestinian village in the West Bank. The Israeli government bars Israelis from entering the Palestinian towns for their safety. Mizrahi lives in the nearby Israeli settlement of Ariel and sells homes there. Tanya Habjouqa for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tanya Habjouqa for NPR

On Sunday, thousands of people gathered in Maidan to mark the first anniversary of anti-government demonstrations that left scores of protesters dead. Geovien So/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Geovien So/Barcroft Media/Landov

Jack Mandelbaum, a Holocaust survivor from the Polish city of Gdynia, poses in front of a photograph showing him as a youth. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

Romanians burn a portrait of Nicolae Ceausescu in Denta on Dec. 22, 1989, as residents take to the streets to celebrate the downfall of the dictator. Joel Robine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joel Robine/AFP/Getty Images

NPR reporter Frank Langfitt and one of his "customers," a biotech worker, whom he drove to a self-help conference in Shanghai's sprawling Pudong District. NPR hide caption

itoggle caption NPR

Flowers, candles and handwritten messages remembering the 43 missing students line the fence at the National Palace in Zocalo, Mexico City. Geovien So/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Geovien So/Barcroft Media/Landov

Mona, 28, narrates during a rehearsal of Antigone. "I feel that Antigone resembles me a lot," says the former resident of Damascus and mother of two. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dalia Khamissy for NPR

Residents wait at the bus stop in the Ronna neighborhood, where Syrian and Iraqi refugees are concentrated in Södertalje, Sweden. The Swedish city is known for its open-door policy toward refugees, especially Christian Syrians and Iraqis. People of Middle Eastern origin make up 30,000 of the town's 90,000 residents. Holly Pickett/Redux/Pulitzer Center hide caption

itoggle caption Holly Pickett/Redux/Pulitzer Center

Two years ago, Honduran Wilson Castro was one of countless migrants trying to make his way to the United States. He decided to stay in Mexico instead and help Adrian Rodriguez Garcia feed other migrants traveling through by train. The two men were murdered recently in Huehuetoca, Mexico. Carrie Kahn hide caption

itoggle caption Carrie Kahn

Construction workers in Irbil, in the Kurdish north of Iraq, work on Kurdish business tycoon Shihab Shihab's version of the White House. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Leila Fadel/NPR

Sultan Qaboos bin Said, 73, salutes during a military parade in the capital Muscat on Oman's national day in November 2013. Qaboos, who has ruled for 44 years, has maintained friendly relations with everyone from the U.S. to Iran. However, he has been abroad for months receiving treatment for an undisclosed illness. Mohammed Mahjoub/AFP/Getty hide caption

itoggle caption Mohammed Mahjoub/AFP/Getty

Lionfish, which are native to the Pacific and Indian oceans, are now present in the Atlantic and the Caribbean, where they are devouring smaller fish that protect reefs. The Caribbean island of Bonaire is teaching divers how to catch the venomous fish. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Sean Carberry/NPR

Hasso Herschel, shown in this undated photo, escaped from East Germany in 1961 by using a borrowed passport. Over the next decade, he helped more than 1,000 people flee by smuggling them through tunnels and hiding them in cars. Courtesy of Hasso Herschel hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Hasso Herschel

Valentin Danilov, 83, is a former executive officer on a Soviet sub who proudly wears his old Soviet military uniform. Crimeans like Danilov have, without changing their residence, lived in three different countries in the past 25 years — the Soviet Union, then Ukraine and now Russia. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Max Avdeev for NPR

Paraguayan government employee Daniel Alonso holds a portrait of Rutherford B. Hayes at the government building in Villa Hayes, the Paraguayan town named after the 19th U.S. president. Hayes is revered for a decision that gave the country 60 percent of its present territory. Jorge Saenz/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jorge Saenz/AP

Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Max Avdeev for NPR

Passengers ride a cable car that links downtown La Paz with El Alto, Bolivia, in September. The trip costs about 40 cents and takes 10 minutes — compared with 35 cents and a half-hour by minibus. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Juan Karita/AP