Daily Picture Show

Women's Day

There's no way to adequately cover the vast realm of women's history. This past weekend was the 98th annual celebration of International Women's Day. And in light of this occasion, we pulled a few images from Flickr Commons, a forum in which museums, libraries and archives can share their photographic collections with the public.

  • The strangely spelled Eadweard J. Muybridge was an English photographer in the late 19th century, most famous for his use of early cameras to capture motion.  This image, circa 1880s, demonstrates the astounding feat of a woman jumping over a stool. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    The strangely spelled Eadweard J. Muybridge was an English photographer in the late 19th century, most famous for his use of early cameras to capture motion. This image, circa 1880s, demonstrates the astounding feat of a woman jumping over a stool. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
  • Women fence and display their daunting musculature in an undated photograph, circa 1885. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    Women fence and display their daunting musculature in an undated photograph, circa 1885. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
  • Photographer William M. Vander Weyde captured this Atlantic City Beach scene circa 1905. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    Photographer William M. Vander Weyde captured this Atlantic City Beach scene circa 1905. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
  • Edward S. Curtis lived in the early 1900s as photographer of the American West and of American Indian peoples.  Titled "A Pomo Girl," this image captures a member of one of the many communities indigenous to California.  Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    Edward S. Curtis lived in the early 1900s as photographer of the American West and of American Indian peoples. Titled "A Pomo Girl," this image captures a member of one of the many communities indigenous to California. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
  • Marie Curie, surrounded by students circa 1910, was a physicist and chemist of Polish descent.  She was a pioneer in the scientific field of radioactivity and was the first twice-honored Nobel laureate — clearly thrilled by her accomplishments.  Image courtesy Library of Congress
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    Marie Curie, surrounded by students circa 1910, was a physicist and chemist of Polish descent. She was a pioneer in the scientific field of radioactivity and was the first twice-honored Nobel laureate — clearly thrilled by her accomplishments. Image courtesy Library of Congress
  • Regardless of where this undated image, titled "The Pioneer's Wife," was taken, one thing is certain: Even ladies in skirts can get their hands dirty. Image courtesy Powerhouse Museum Collection
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    Regardless of where this undated image, titled "The Pioneer's Wife," was taken, one thing is certain: Even ladies in skirts can get their hands dirty. Image courtesy Powerhouse Museum Collection
  • Little to no information exists about this image from the Powerhouse Museum Collection, except that this woman bore an uncanny resemblance to Charlie Chaplin and perhaps even beat him at his own mustache-growing game.
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    Little to no information exists about this image from the Powerhouse Museum Collection, except that this woman bore an uncanny resemblance to Charlie Chaplin and perhaps even beat him at his own mustache-growing game.
  • Circa 1910, London was suffragette city.  Not until 1920 were women granted the right to vote, although restrictions lasted until the 1960s for African-Americans.  And not until 1928 was universal suffrage granted in the United Kingdom. Here, officials arrest a woman for her intolerable proposition that all people are created equal.  Image courtesy Library of Congress
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    Circa 1910, London was suffragette city. Not until 1920 were women granted the right to vote, although restrictions lasted until the 1960s for African-Americans. And not until 1928 was universal suffrage granted in the United Kingdom. Here, officials arrest a woman for her intolerable proposition that all people are created equal. Image courtesy Library of Congress
  • Circa 1912, a 14-year-old striker (left) poses with Fola La Follette (center), activist and daughter of Wisconsin Gov. and U.S. Sen. Robert M. La Follette Sr., and Rose Livingston, former prostitute turned social reformer. Image courtesy Library of Congress
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    Circa 1912, a 14-year-old striker (left) poses with Fola La Follette (center), activist and daughter of Wisconsin Gov. and U.S. Sen. Robert M. La Follette Sr., and Rose Livingston, former prostitute turned social reformer. Image courtesy Library of Congress
  • Photographer Charles C. Zoller most likely captured this image, "Bathers at Fine View," in Fineview, N.Y., in the early 1900s.  Not until 1946 was the first bikini introduced. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    Photographer Charles C. Zoller most likely captured this image, "Bathers at Fine View," in Fineview, N.Y., in the early 1900s. Not until 1946 was the first bikini introduced. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
  • French photographer Charles Chusseau-Flaviens captured this image titled "Hollande scenes villageoises," or Holland villager scenes, in the early 1900s.  Apparently female Hollanders lived on the edge — quite literally as they are about to ring-around-the-rosy right off a cliff.  Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    French photographer Charles Chusseau-Flaviens captured this image titled "Hollande scenes villageoises," or Holland villager scenes, in the early 1900s. Apparently female Hollanders lived on the edge — quite literally as they are about to ring-around-the-rosy right off a cliff. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
  • Victor Keppler took this photograph of aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart circa 1935, two years before her disappearance over the Pacific Ocean. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    Victor Keppler took this photograph of aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart circa 1935, two years before her disappearance over the Pacific Ocean. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
  • Appealing to a love of both America and lingerie, this advertisement for Carter Corsets is dated December 1938. George Eastman House Collection
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    Appealing to a love of both America and lingerie, this advertisement for Carter Corsets is dated December 1938. George Eastman House Collection
  • Pearl Harbor widow Virginia Young (right), whose husband was one of the first casualties of World War II, was a supervisor in the Assembly and Repairs Department of the Naval Air Base, circa 1942.  Like many women during WWII, these two took up the responsibility of providing for their families. Image courtesy Library of Congress
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    Pearl Harbor widow Virginia Young (right), whose husband was one of the first casualties of World War II, was a supervisor in the Assembly and Repairs Department of the Naval Air Base, circa 1942. Like many women during WWII, these two took up the responsibility of providing for their families. Image courtesy Library of Congress
  • Taken in Tallahassee between 1885 and 1910, this image compared with the next demonstrates a distinctive shift in both women's fashion and women's rights. Image courtesy State Library and Archives of Florida
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    Taken in Tallahassee between 1885 and 1910, this image compared with the next demonstrates a distinctive shift in both women's fashion and women's rights. Image courtesy State Library and Archives of Florida
  • The 1960s were the decade for social upheaval.  Not only were historical inroads made for Civil Rights, but women continued to struggle for equality.  "Ave B." was taken by photographer James Jowers in 1967 and is one of 50 images in a set of New York in the 1960s on Flickr. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    The 1960s were the decade for social upheaval. Not only were historical inroads made for Civil Rights, but women continued to struggle for equality. "Ave B." was taken by photographer James Jowers in 1967 and is one of 50 images in a set of New York in the 1960s on Flickr. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
  • A woman enjoys the music of a brass band and the liberty afforded by a miniskirt in New York City, 1972. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection
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    A woman enjoys the music of a brass band and the liberty afforded by a miniskirt in New York City, 1972. Image courtesy George Eastman House Collection

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By no means does this gallery cover everything. But here are a few fun and interesting moments in women's history — some momentous, others ordinary — simply illustrating that, if anything, as cameras developed, so did women's rights.

All images via Flickr Commons.

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