Daily Picture Show

Remembering Marty Lederhandler, AP Photographer

Marty Lederhandler had a portfolio of images that many photojournalists can only dream of capturing: Fidel Castro hugging Nikita Khrushchev, Lyndon Johnson eating a cookie, Elmo "tickling" Kofi Annan (in the figurative sense). Over the course of his 66-year photography career, most of which was spent with The Associated Press, Lederhandler not only witnessed huge historic moments – from D-Day to Sept. 11 – but also captured them for the world to see. Lederhandler died last week at 92. Here's a small retrospective selection of his work.

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    The twin towers of the World Trade Center burn behind the Empire State Building in New York, on Sept. 11, 2001.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    People in front of New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral react with horror as they see the World Trade Center towers after planes crashed into their upper floors.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro (left) is embraced by Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev in the United Nations General Assembly, Sept. 20, 1960.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    A security guard shields actor Sidney Poitier from a mob of fans, June 11, 1980, New York City.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    Artist and underground filmmaker Andy Warhol at his studio, The Factory, Sept. 19, 1968.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (left) receives an award for best actress from Irene Thirer, chairman of the New York Film Critics, Jan. 19, 1957.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    Former heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali signs autographs in New York, Sept. 15, 1982.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    President Lyndon Johnson smiles while eating a cookie, while George Meany, president of the AFL-CIO, laughs at a speaker's remark during a Jewish labor committee dinner at the Sheraton in New York.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    Farrah Fawcett at rehearsal for the off-Broadway show Extremities, at the Westside Arts Theater in New York, May 11, 1983.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    Academic luminary Bertrand Russell poses in New York.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    Rubin "Hurricane" Carter of Paterson, N.J., watches Florentino Fernandez of Cuba fall through the ropes after being knocked out in the first round of a fight at New York's Madison Square Garden.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP
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    United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan laughs while taping a scene with Elmo during production of an episode of Sesame Street, Dec. 6, 2001. Annan offered Elmo a job at the United Nations and Elmo asked if he could win a Nobel prize, too.
    All photos by Marty Lederhandler/AP

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Marty Lederhandler

Marty Lederhandler Ed Bailey/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Bailey/AP

An AP obituary delineates his impressive career in names:

... a panorama of the 20th century's proud and profane — every New York mayor from Fiorello LaGuardia to Rudy Giuliani; Haile Selassie; Eleanor Roosevelt; Queen Elizabeth II; Elizabeth Taylor; Sophia Loren; heavyweight champs Jack Dempsey, Joe Louis and Muhammad Ali; Gen. Douglas MacArthur; gangster Frank Costello; convicted spy Ethel Rosenberg; bank robber Willie Sutton; Bertrand Russell; Aristotle Onassis; Groucho Marx; Malcolm X; Anwar Sadat; Yasser Arafat; Nelson Mandela; Frank Sinatra; the Beatles and Luciano Pavarotti; among others.

To learn more about Lederhandler's life, read this bio in The Digital Journalist.

Photographer Marty Lederhandler during WWII

Lt. Marty Lederhandler, serving as a U.S. Army Signal Corps photographer, stands in a town square in Normandy, France, about a week after the D-Day invasion of France, June, 1944. AP hide caption

itoggle caption AP

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