Editor's Pick

What Did One NASA Guy Say To The Other?

"On Flickr, photography is rocket science!"

  • Apparently something hilarious had just happened at NASA. My imagination is running wild. A high five goes to whoever can come up with the best caption for this photo, taken just after the Apollo 11 launch, 1969.
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    Apparently something hilarious had just happened at NASA. My imagination is running wild. A high five goes to whoever can come up with the best caption for this photo, taken just after the Apollo 11 launch, 1969.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • John Glenn in his awesome space outfit, prior to the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission, 1962. To his right, NASA flight surgeon William Douglas, and equipment specialist Joseph W. Schmidt (center) in less-awesome outfits.
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    John Glenn in his awesome space outfit, prior to the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission, 1962. To his right, NASA flight surgeon William Douglas, and equipment specialist Joseph W. Schmidt (center) in less-awesome outfits.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • Neither bird nor plane, it's a NASA administrator (left) pointing out the Apollo 10 liftoff to Belgium's king and queen in 1969 (as if he'd need to point). Please note the woman's face on the bottom right.
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    Neither bird nor plane, it's a NASA administrator (left) pointing out the Apollo 10 liftoff to Belgium's king and queen in 1969 (as if he'd need to point). Please note the woman's face on the bottom right.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • Lyndon Johnson and other grinning spectators watch the Apoloo 11 liftoff in 1969.
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    Lyndon Johnson and other grinning spectators watch the Apoloo 11 liftoff in 1969.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • A new phase of space flight began in 1950 with the launch of the first rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla.: Bumper 2. Note the odd melange of equipment at the bottom left, which resembles something along the lines of an 19th-century inventor's laboratory, including what appears to be a phonograph and a view camera. The bare necessities, of course.
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    A new phase of space flight began in 1950 with the launch of the first rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla.: Bumper 2. Note the odd melange of equipment at the bottom left, which resembles something along the lines of an 19th-century inventor's laboratory, including what appears to be a phonograph and a view camera. The bare necessities, of course.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • Almost 60 years later, the Endeavor space shuttled launches at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, 2009.
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    Almost 60 years later, the Endeavor space shuttled launches at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, 2009.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • An aerial shot of a testing ground looks like it could have been taken by Edward Burtynsky.
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    An aerial shot of a testing ground looks like it could have been taken by Edward Burtynsky.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • Viking 1 launched in 1976, beginning its half-billion mile journey to Mars.
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    Viking 1 launched in 1976, beginning its half-billion mile journey to Mars.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • A primitive rocket makes its way to the moon. Just kidding. The Paresev was an experimental glider used for testing parachute wings.
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    A primitive rocket makes its way to the moon. Just kidding. The Paresev was an experimental glider used for testing parachute wings.
    NASA via Flickr Commons
  • A NASA scientist needs to explain how this 1998 photo was taken.
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    A NASA scientist needs to explain how this 1998 photo was taken.
    NASA via Flickr Commons

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Ok, that's really lame. In less-lame terms, NASA is a new contributor to Flickr Commons, which means they've uploaded archival images for public use. Here are a few — but you can see many more on their page.

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