National Geographic

Surprising Portraits: Photos Of Feathers

National Geographic

There's a science-y article in National Geographic's January issue about how birds are dinosaurs and how feathers are evolutionary marvels. But the real thing to check out is this portraiture. Feather portraiture, to be exact, by photographer Robert Clark.

The signature of the King-Bird of paradise is its two wiry tail feathers that wobble during display; the tail feathers are tipped with emerald green disks.

The signature of the King-Bird of paradise is its two wiry tail feathers that wobble during display; the tail feathers are tipped with emerald green disks. Robert Clark/National Geographic hide caption

itoggle caption Robert Clark/National Geographic
Not only does the Red-crested Turaco sport a pretty rad faux-hawk, but it also has beautiful, bright red feathers.

Not only does the Red-crested Turaco sport a pretty rad faux-hawk, but it also has beautiful, bright red feathers. Robert Clark/National Geographic hide caption

itoggle caption Robert Clark/National Geographic
The Northern Flicker is a type of woodpecker; its tail feathers assist in climbing.

The Northern Flicker is a type of woodpecker; its tail feathers assist in climbing. Robert Clark/National Geographic hide caption

itoggle caption Robert Clark/National Geographic
The Golden-headed quetzal of South America is brightly colored, with iridescent feathers.

The Golden-headed quetzal of South America is brightly colored, with iridescent feathers. Robert Clark/National Geographic hide caption

itoggle caption Robert Clark/National Geographic

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