Editor's Pick

Japan: One Month After The Quake

Japan is still reeling from the 9.0- magnitude earthquake and tsunami — and series of aftershocks — that have left the country in disrepair. According to the AP, thousands are missing or dead, entire cities lie in ruin and the fear of radiation still looms. But exactly one month after that first quake, people in Japan and abroad are taking time Monday to pray, to remember the dead, or to express hope for a brighter future. Here are just a few scenes:

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    A month after the earthquake and tsunami devastation, flowers are offered Monday Okawa Elementary school in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture on Monday. Japan fell silent at 2:46 pm to mark exactly one month since the disaster.
    Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images
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    Ren Sato, 9, removes sand from a damaged family grave in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture.
    Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images
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    Tsunami survivor Kenichi Kurosawa (center) and his friends draw words that translate to "hang in there" on a billboard in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture.
    Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images
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    Members of the Japanese military offer a silent prayer for the dead in Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture.
    Kazuhiro Nogi/Getty Images
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    A Buddhist monk prays for earthquake victims at a burial site in Higashimatsushima, Miyagi prefecture. A tsunami warning was issued Monday after a 6.6 aftershock struck south of Fukushima.
    Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images
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    Two-year-old Ayaka (center) and family members pray for her missing grandmother and great-grandmother at a vacant lot where they lived in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture.
    Yasuyoshi Chiba/Getty Images
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    A Japanese Buddhist monk prays at an area devastated by the earthquake and tsunami in Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture on Sunday.
    Sergey Ponomarev/AP

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