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Photos: The Unabomber's Personal Effects For Sale

It may seem really odd that anyone would ever bid on "Unabomber" Ted Kaczynski's personal effects. In fact, this type of auction is really unusual, says Lynzey Donahue, spokesperson for the U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs. Read the full story.

  • The personal effects of Ted Kaczynski, aka the Unabomber, are being sold via an online auction by the U.S. Marshals. Kaczynski used different methods to disguise his identity when he traveled to commit his crimes.
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    The personal effects of Ted Kaczynski, aka the Unabomber, are being sold via an online auction by the U.S. Marshals. Kaczynski used different methods to disguise his identity when he traveled to commit his crimes.
    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
  • Proceeds from the auction will be used to compensate Kaczynski's victims. Kaczynski hunted animals for food in the mountain wilderness using bows and arrows.
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    Proceeds from the auction will be used to compensate Kaczynski's victims. Kaczynski hunted animals for food in the mountain wilderness using bows and arrows.
    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
  • This was one of Kaczynski's homemade "tool kits." He kept small tools in several makeshift containers, including this Tide box.
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    This was one of Kaczynski's homemade "tool kits." He kept small tools in several makeshift containers, including this Tide box.
    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
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    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
  • Kaczynski's clothing collection was somewhat limited and very functional, chosen to protect him from the elements of the Montana wilderness.
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    Kaczynski's clothing collection was somewhat limited and very functional, chosen to protect him from the elements of the Montana wilderness.
    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
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    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
  • Kaczynski cast some metal parts (including aluminum) by melting metal scraps on his cabin's wood burning stove.
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    Kaczynski cast some metal parts (including aluminum) by melting metal scraps on his cabin's wood burning stove.
    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
  • He supplemented his Unabomb funds by extracting money from his mother and brother for help with fictitious problems such as medical expenses.
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    He supplemented his Unabomb funds by extracting money from his mother and brother for help with fictitious problems such as medical expenses.
    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
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    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
  • These small hand tools were removed from Kaczynski's cabin during the search. Kaczynski's construction of Unabomb explosive devices was all done by hand, without assistance of power tools.
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    These small hand tools were removed from Kaczynski's cabin during the search. Kaczynski's construction of Unabomb explosive devices was all done by hand, without assistance of power tools.
    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
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    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs
  • No Alternative Text
    U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs

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In 2010, U.S. District Judge Garland Burrell of the Eastern District of California gave a court order to sell Kaczynski's possessions. Proceeds from the auction will be used to compensate his victims.

His handwritten manifesto, for example, is currently fetching more than $17,000 — and that's with eight days remaining. Who's buying this stuff? Well, anyone could; it's open to the public. But it's likely that the big bidders are museums, artifact collectors and media outlets, says Donahue.

There are more photos on the U.S. Marshals Flickr site. But the most intriguing images are the ones that show Kaczynski's things in a meticulous, taxonomic fashion. It's like a clinical observation of his world — of the simple tools and objects that he, meticulously and clinically, used to commit his murders.

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