National Archives Puts Photos On The Map

Civil War photographer Mathew Brady's studio was located on Pennsylvania Avenue, seen here in a photograph from 1890. i i

Civil War photographer Mathew Brady's studio was located on Pennsylvania Avenue, seen here in a photograph from 1890. Historypin/The National Archives hide caption

itoggle caption Historypin/The National Archives
Civil War photographer Mathew Brady's studio was located on Pennsylvania Avenue, seen here in a photograph from 1890.

Civil War photographer Mathew Brady's studio was located on Pennsylvania Avenue, seen here in a photograph from 1890.

Historypin/The National Archives

Thanks to an interactive photo history site called Historypin, you can now see the street where Civil War photographer Mathew Brady kept his studio. What's cooler is you can shift back and forth between the modern-day view of that street, and the 1890s view.

You can pin your old photos to a Google map on Historypin — or you can browse through photos that have been uploaded by major institutions. The National Archives, for example, announced today that it has joined the website, adding photos by Brady, photos from the Environmental Protection Agency's Documerica photographic documentation project of the 1970s, and historic scenes of Washington, D.C.

Take a tour of old D.C.; a few photos appear below. Or view more of the National Archives' photos on Historypin.

Almost completed when this photograph was taken on Aug. 13, 1935, construction signs can be seen outside the National Archives building.

Almost completed when this photograph was taken on Aug. 13, 1935, construction signs can be seen outside the National Archives building. Historypin/The National Archives hide caption

itoggle caption Historypin/The National Archives
In this 1937 photograph taken from the vantage point of the National Archives building, completed just two years earlier, notice the clear view — today obscured — to the U.S. Capitol Building beyond the National Gallery of Art construction site.

In this 1937 photograph taken from the vantage point of the National Archives building, completed just two years earlier, notice the clear view — today obscured — to the U.S. Capitol Building beyond the National Gallery of Art construction site. Historypin/The National Archives hide caption

itoggle caption Historypin/The National Archives
This image of Ford's Theatre was taken during President Lincoln's time and is similar to what the Lincolns would have seen as they arrived there by carriage on April 14, 1865.

This image of Ford's Theatre was taken during President Lincoln's time and is similar to what the Lincolns would have seen as they arrived there by carriage on April 14, 1865. Historypin/The National Archives hide caption

itoggle caption Historypin/The National Archives
Just south of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center is the current site of the D.C. Historical Society, originally a Carnegie Library, circa 1910-1940.

Just south of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center is the current site of the D.C. Historical Society, originally a Carnegie Library, circa 1910-1940. Historypin/The National Archives hide caption

itoggle caption Historypin/The National Archives

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