Editor's Pick

Flight From Syria: A Photographer's Story

On a street in Baba Amr, the house where Daniels and three other journalists were holed up for days is behind the building at right. i i

hide captionOn a street in Baba Amr, the house where Daniels and three other journalists were holed up for days is behind the building at right.

William Daniels/Panos/Time
On a street in Baba Amr, the house where Daniels and three other journalists were holed up for days is behind the building at right.

On a street in Baba Amr, the house where Daniels and three other journalists were holed up for days is behind the building at right.

William Daniels/Panos/Time
French photographer William Daniels (left) speaks with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy at a military airport outside Paris on March 2, just after escaping from Syria via Lebanon. i i

hide captionFrench photographer William Daniels (left) speaks with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy at a military airport outside Paris on March 2, just after escaping from Syria via Lebanon.

Jacques Demarthon/AFP/Getty Images
French photographer William Daniels (left) speaks with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy at a military airport outside Paris on March 2, just after escaping from Syria via Lebanon.

French photographer William Daniels (left) speaks with France's President Nicolas Sarkozy at a military airport outside Paris on March 2, just after escaping from Syria via Lebanon.

Jacques Demarthon/AFP/Getty Images

While on assignment for Time magazine, war photographer William Daniels sneaked into Syria to cover the military siege of the Baba Amr neighborhood of Homs. He had only spent a few hours there — in "a makeshift press center," as Time describes — when a shelling attack killed American reporter Marie Colvin and French photographer Remi Ochlik on Feb. 22, and left several others injured.

The cover story in this week's issue of Time is devoted to Daniels' account of that attack — and what came after.

A baby wounded by shrapnel is shown at the main clinic in the Baba Amr district of Homs, Syria. "It's very scary. The hospital is not very protected. Most of the windows are broken from the blasts," Daniels says. "The doctors kept working. They look like they don't even hear the noise of the bombing. They are very brave people." i i

hide captionA baby wounded by shrapnel is shown at the main clinic in the Baba Amr district of Homs, Syria. "It's very scary. The hospital is not very protected. Most of the windows are broken from the blasts," Daniels says. "The doctors kept working. They look like they don't even hear the noise of the bombing. They are very brave people."

William Daniels/Panos/Time
A baby wounded by shrapnel is shown at the main clinic in the Baba Amr district of Homs, Syria. "It's very scary. The hospital is not very protected. Most of the windows are broken from the blasts," Daniels says. "The doctors kept working. They look like they don't even hear the noise of the bombing. They are very brave people."

A baby wounded by shrapnel is shown at the main clinic in the Baba Amr district of Homs, Syria. "It's very scary. The hospital is not very protected. Most of the windows are broken from the blasts," Daniels says. "The doctors kept working. They look like they don't even hear the noise of the bombing. They are very brave people."

William Daniels/Panos/Time

"His dramatic story is a microcosm of what millions of Syrians are going through, only they cannot escape the iron hand of their government and their suffering is far worse," writes Rick Stengel, the managing editor of Time writes in the magazine. Stengel continues:

We tell this story, to not only document the atrocities occurring in Syria but also highlight the fact that journalists like Daniels, Bouvier, Ochlik and Colvin have been the primary means by which the world even knows what is going on there.

In an interview with NPR's Melissa Block, Daniels says he would rather discuss what is happening in Syria than what happened to him and his colleagues. Click the audio to hear that interview.

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