Daily Picture Show

Who's The Girl Scout In This Photo?

Fun fact: Today, Girl Scouts are celebrating 100 years of existence. I came across this single, striking image taken by renowned Life photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt (known for his V-J Day In Times Square photo) in 1940 — and can't help but wonder who the girl is. Any ideas? She looks like she's about 13, which would put her at about 85 years old.

A Girl Scout salutes the flag with three fingers, New York, January 1940

A Girl Scout salutes the flag with three fingers, New York, January 1940 Alfred Eisenstaedt/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Alfred Eisenstaedt/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Life has more historical photos — of the first-ever Girl Scout, Daisy Gordon Lawrence.

The first girl scout, Daisy Gordon Lawrence (left), demonstrates techniques like rope-tying and fire-making to young scouts in the late 1940s. See more from this series on Life's site.

The first girl scout, Daisy Gordon Lawrence (left), demonstrates techniques like rope-tying and fire-making to young scouts in the late 1940s. See more from this series on Life's site. Francis Miller/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Francis Miller/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Some more fun facts:

  • The green and white Girl Scouts emblem was designed by legendary graphic designer Saul Bass (though it was "revised" a few years ago).
  • The founder of the Girl Scouts was nearly deaf.
  • Notable former Girl Scouts include Hillary Clinton, Condoleezza Rice and Lucille Ball.
  • Thin Mints are the most popular selling Girl Scout cookie, according to The Washington Post.
  • The Library of Congress has a great collection of early Girl Scout photos.

Were you a Girl Scout and do you have photos? Share them with us! Most important, what's your favorite cookie?

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