Editor's Pick

If You Don't Know The Name Horst Faas, Look At This

  • The sun breaks through dense jungle foliage as South Vietnamese troops, joined by U.S. advisers, rest after a cold, damp and tense night of waiting in an ambush position for a Viet Cong attack that didn't come, January 1965.
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    The sun breaks through dense jungle foliage as South Vietnamese troops, joined by U.S. advisers, rest after a cold, damp and tense night of waiting in an ambush position for a Viet Cong attack that didn't come, January 1965.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • Faas, a prize-winning combat photographer who became one of the world's legendary photojournalists, died May 10, 2012, at the age of 79. Here, he is shown in Vietnam in 1967.
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    Faas, a prize-winning combat photographer who became one of the world's legendary photojournalists, died May 10, 2012, at the age of 79. Here, he is shown in Vietnam in 1967.
    AP Photo/AP unless noted
  • Hovering U.S. Army helicopters pour machine-gun fire into the tree line to cover the advance of South Vietnamese ground troops in an attack on the Viet Cong, March 1965.
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    Hovering U.S. Army helicopters pour machine-gun fire into the tree line to cover the advance of South Vietnamese ground troops in an attack on the Viet Cong, March 1965.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • Landing light from a medical evacuation helicopter cuts through the smoke of battle for Bu Dop, South Vietnam, November 1967.
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    Landing light from a medical evacuation helicopter cuts through the smoke of battle for Bu Dop, South Vietnam, November 1967.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • A father holds the body of his child as South Vietnamese Army Rangers look down from an armored vehicle, March 1964. The child was killed as government forces pursued guerrillas into a village near the Cambodian border. This is one of several photos that earned Faas the first of two Pulitzer Prizes.
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    A father holds the body of his child as South Vietnamese Army Rangers look down from an armored vehicle, March 1964. The child was killed as government forces pursued guerrillas into a village near the Cambodian border. This is one of several photos that earned Faas the first of two Pulitzer Prizes.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • A Vietnamese medic wears a face mask to keep out the smell as he passes the bodies of U.S. and Vietnamese soildiers killed fighting the Viet Cong, November 1965.
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    A Vietnamese medic wears a face mask to keep out the smell as he passes the bodies of U.S. and Vietnamese soildiers killed fighting the Viet Cong, November 1965.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • An American soldier guards the road as Vietnamese women and schoolchildren return home, December 1965.
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    An American soldier guards the road as Vietnamese women and schoolchildren return home, December 1965.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • In a quiet moment, soldiers read newspapers and magazines at their bunker in a jungle clearing in South Vietnam, November 1966.
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    In a quiet moment, soldiers read newspapers and magazines at their bunker in a jungle clearing in South Vietnam, November 1966.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • U.S. machine gunner Spc. 4 James R. Pointer (left) and Pfc. Herald Spracklen of Effingham, Ill., peer from the brush of an overgrown rubber plantation during a firefight, December 1967.
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    U.S. machine gunner Spc. 4 James R. Pointer (left) and Pfc. Herald Spracklen of Effingham, Ill., peer from the brush of an overgrown rubber plantation during a firefight, December 1967.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • A boy carries a toy rifle past French soldiers at the Bastille Palace in Oran, Algeria, May 1962.
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    A boy carries a toy rifle past French soldiers at the Bastille Palace in Oran, Algeria, May 1962.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • Scores of eager hands reach toward the Congolese official who distributes small rations of dried fish and palm oil to people at the hospital in Miabi, South Kasai, Congo, January 1961.
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    Scores of eager hands reach toward the Congolese official who distributes small rations of dried fish and palm oil to people at the hospital in Miabi, South Kasai, Congo, January 1961.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • Presidents Anwar Sadat and Richard Nixon shake hands in front of the pyramids at Giza, near Cairo, June 1974.
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    Presidents Anwar Sadat and Richard Nixon shake hands in front of the pyramids at Giza, near Cairo, June 1974.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • Muhammad Ali works out before his bout against George Foreman in Zaire, October 1974.
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    Muhammad Ali works out before his bout against George Foreman in Zaire, October 1974.
    Horst Faas/AP unless noted
  • Faas (left),with Vietnamese-American photographer Nick Ut, both Pulitzer Prize winners who covered the Vietnam War, share a moment during a reunion party in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, marking the 30th anniversary of the war's end, April 2005.
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    Faas (left),with Vietnamese-American photographer Nick Ut, both Pulitzer Prize winners who covered the Vietnam War, share a moment during a reunion party in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, marking the 30th anniversary of the war's end, April 2005.
    Richard Vogel/AP/AP unless noted

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Of all the memorable photographs that came out of the Vietnam War, Horst Faas was probably responsible for more of them than any other photographer.

Faas, who died in Munich on Thursday at age 79, spent eight years in Vietnam for The Associated Press. He was willing to go anywhere no matter what the risks, and he was relentless in his pursuit of images that captured the war.

He won a Pulitzer Prize. He was badly injured. And he was a stern taskmaster who helped mentor countless photographers, both Vietnamese and Westerners.

He assembled some of the best photography from Vietnam in Requiem, a 1997 book about photographers killed on both sides of the conflict.

Having survived all those years as a combat photographer, Faas returned to Vietnam in 2005 for a reunion of the press corps 30 years after the war's end. He fell ill there, the result of a spinal hemorrhage that left him paralyzed from the waist down for the final years of his life.

Just dwell on this image for a minute or two, and you get a sense of the power of Faas' photos:

South Vietnamese children gaze at an American paratrooper as they cling to their mothers, hiding from Viet Cong sniper fire west of Saigon, January 1966. i i

South Vietnamese children gaze at an American paratrooper as they cling to their mothers, hiding from Viet Cong sniper fire west of Saigon, January 1966. Horst Faas/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Horst Faas/AP
South Vietnamese children gaze at an American paratrooper as they cling to their mothers, hiding from Viet Cong sniper fire west of Saigon, January 1966.

South Vietnamese children gaze at an American paratrooper as they cling to their mothers, hiding from Viet Cong sniper fire west of Saigon, January 1966.

Horst Faas/AP

There's much, much more where this came from, in the full obituary.

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