Daily Picture Show

A Window Into The Photography Of Gordon Parks

If you want people to see something, it's probably best to put it somewhere visible. For a long time, that might have meant the pages of Life magazine. Today, perhaps that means a place where passers-by can stop for a minute, or tweet a photo, or even listen to an audio guide just by dialing a phone number. Say, for example, in New York City.

A photo of someone taking a photo of photos by Gordon Parks.

A photo of someone taking a photo of photos by Gordon Parks. Kristen Lubben/Courtesy of Maurice Berger hide caption

itoggle caption Kristen Lubben/Courtesy of Maurice Berger

That's exactly what you'll find if you happen to be ambling around 6th Avenue, in the windows of the International Center of Photography.

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    Emerging Man, Harlem, 1952
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Ingrid Bergman, Stromboli, Italy, 1949
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    James Galanos Fashion Worn by Gloria Vanderbilt, Hollywood, California, 1961
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Muhammad Ali Gives Kids Autographs to Young Fans, Miami, Florida, 1970
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Bessie and Little Richard the Morning After She Scalded Her Husband, Harlem, New York, 1968
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Reflection of Women's Dresses, 1951
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Drug Search, Chicago, Illinois, 1957
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Woman Dying, Chicago, Illinois, 1953
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Duke Ellington on Several Television Monitors at Station KQED, San Francisco, California, 1960
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Mary Machado, Mother of Isabell Lopez, and Family, Gloucester, Massachusetts, 1943
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Nuns, Paris, France, 1951
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Female Race Spectator, Estoril, Portugal, 1951
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Isabel Beside Sick Father, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1961
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Harlem Neighborhood, Harlem, New York, 1952
    Gordon Parks/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography
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    Street Corner, 7th Street and Florida Avenue, Washington, D.C., 1942
    Courtesy of Library of Congress/Courtesy of the International Center of Photography

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The unorthodox digital display — three mounted monitors running a looped slideshow — is a tribute to Gordon Parks, the first African-American staff photographer for Life magazine, who would have been 100 this year.

American film director and photographer Gordon Parks on the set of a film, circa 1971. i i

American film director and photographer Gordon Parks on the set of a film, circa 1971. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Hulton Archive/Getty Images
American film director and photographer Gordon Parks on the set of a film, circa 1971.

American film director and photographer Gordon Parks on the set of a film, circa 1971.

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

And although the installation is undeniably modern in contrast to the photos themselves, Parks might have approved of the idea.

"It's so Gordon Parks, in a way," says curator Maurice Berger. "He wanted to reach as many people as possible."

How do you sum up the life and work of someone like Parks — who escaped poverty in order to document it, who endured racism while photographing it, a writer-photographer-filmmaker whose work spans a huge swath of the 20th century?

It's next to impossible in this square-inch of cyberspace — and the ICP's window installation probably isn't meant to do it, either. It may be as simple as raising awareness.

"We want all the younger generations to know who this guy is," Berger says.

And who was he?

"He was a jack of all trades and, in a funny way, a master of all," says Berger. Case in point: On the Gordon Parks foundation website, you'll find photos of the civil rights movement and of poverty around the world — right next to glamorous fashion shoots.

He was a documentarian, "both of how far we've come and how far we need to go."

You can learn more about Parks in this 1997 interview, or on the Gordon Parks Foundation website.

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