Daily Picture Show

Revisiting Superstorm Sandy: One Year Later In Photos

Firefighters (left) walk the streets of Long Beach, N.Y., after Superstorm Sandy, on Oct. 31, 2012. A man crosses the street about a year later, on Oct. 22. i i

hide captionFirefighters (left) walk the streets of Long Beach, N.Y., after Superstorm Sandy, on Oct. 31, 2012. A man crosses the street about a year later, on Oct. 22.

Andrew Burton/Getty Images
Firefighters (left) walk the streets of Long Beach, N.Y., after Superstorm Sandy, on Oct. 31, 2012. A man crosses the street about a year later, on Oct. 22.

Firefighters (left) walk the streets of Long Beach, N.Y., after Superstorm Sandy, on Oct. 31, 2012. A man crosses the street about a year later, on Oct. 22.

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

It's been a year since Superstorm Sandy tore up the Atlantic coast — one of the biggest and most expensive hurricanes in the region's history. The images at the time were remarkable: rows of homes washed from their foundations; New York City's Hugh Carey Tunnel completely flooded; a boat washed up onto a New Jersey front yard — its bow piercing straight through the front door.

But a lot can change in a year — and equally remarkable are these images that show it. A few photographers with the agency Getty Images revisited some sites to see what they look like now. Cars are back on the Carey Tunnel, yards have been cleaned, and homes are sprouting up again — some now on stilts.

In pairs, the photos show how destructive Sandy was: Where the historic Princess Cottage, built in 1855, once stood is now an empty field in Union Beach, N.J. The photos also show how life goes on: Many residents are continuing the slow process of rebuilding their homes and lives.

  • The iconic Princess Cottage, built in 1855, barely remains standing on Nov. 21, 2012, in Union Beach, N.J., after being ravaged by flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy.
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    The iconic Princess Cottage, built in 1855, barely remains standing on Nov. 21, 2012, in Union Beach, N.J., after being ravaged by flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy.
    Mario Tama/Getty Images
  • The spot where the Princess Cottage used to stand, Oct. 22, 2013.
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    The spot where the Princess Cottage used to stand, Oct. 22, 2013.
    Andrew Burton/Getty Images
  • The Monmouth Beach pavilion is surrounded by debris on Nov. 8, 2012, in Monmouth, N.J.
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    The Monmouth Beach pavilion is surrounded by debris on Nov. 8, 2012, in Monmouth, N.J.
    Allison Joyce/Getty Images
  • The Monmouth Beach pavilion on Oct. 22, 2013.
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    The Monmouth Beach pavilion on Oct. 22, 2013.
    Andrew Burton/Getty Images
  • The remains of burned homes are surrounded by water in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., Oct. 31, 2012.
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    The remains of burned homes are surrounded by water in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., Oct. 31, 2012.
    Mario Tama/Getty Images
  • Newly built homes and vacant lots in Queens, 2013.
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    Newly built homes and vacant lots in Queens, 2013.
    Andrew Burton/Getty Images
  • Rising water caused by Sandy rushes into New York City's Hugh L. Carey Tunnel (previously known as the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel), Oct. 29, 2012.
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    Rising water caused by Sandy rushes into New York City's Hugh L. Carey Tunnel (previously known as the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel), Oct. 29, 2012.
    Andrew Burton/Getty Images
  • Cars are back on the roads in October 2013.
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    Cars are back on the roads in October 2013.
    Andrew Burton/Getty Images
  • Sand and debris surround homes in Seaside Heights, N.J., Oct. 31, 2012.
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    Sand and debris surround homes in Seaside Heights, N.J., Oct. 31, 2012.
    Mario Tama/Getty Images
  • Homes in Seaside Heights, N.J., 2013.
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    Homes in Seaside Heights, N.J., 2013.
    Andrew Burton/Getty Images

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