44 Senators — And 10 Ex-Senators — To Pay Last Respects For Ted Kennedy

Dark, ominous skies over Washington today, a good portion of which I've spent watching cable TV showing the thousands of people filing past Edward Kennedy's casket as his body lies in repose at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston — just one indication of the respect many had for the longtime "Liberal Lion" of the Senate.

Later today, some 54 current and former senators will attend a private memorial service.

Tomorrow morning, President Obama will give a eulogy at the funeral in Boston, which will be attended by three of the four living former presidents: Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush.

Kennedy's body will then be flown to Washington, where he will be buried tomorrow evening at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

Speaking of eulogies ... "LaurieInQueens," an acquaintance on Twitter and an unabashed Kennedyphile, writes that she found herself drifting back to the eulogies Kennedy himself gave in the past that remain so memorable. And there were plenty of them. NPR's Mary Glendinning has compiled a list of eulogies given by Kennedy, which includes Robert F. Kennedy, John F. Kennedy Jr., Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Coretta Scott King, Rose Kennedy and Pierre Salinger.

Here's a quick video of part of his eulogy to Bobby Kennedy:

A must read. In the scores of articles and blog posts I've read about Kennedy these past two days, one especially stands out: yesterday's piece in the New York Times by Mark Leibovich. An extremely well-written and poignant article about Kennedy's last days. Absolutely worth reading if you haven't seen it.

Here's another story, one I had never heard of before, about Kennedy coming to the funeral of slain Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin with earth he had personally dug from the graves of his two murdered brothers. From Talking Points Memo.

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