Last Week's ScuttleButton Puzzle Produces Two Winners

Mr. Vice President,

Madame Speaker,

The state of the weekly ScuttleButton puzzle is good!

So good that it's time to announce this week's winner. Or should I say, winners. But first, before I explain, a reminder of how to play the game.

Simply check out my button puzzle in this space each Friday. Take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and arrive at a familiar saying or a name. (Seriously: a saying that people from Earth might be remotely familiar with.) Submit your answer and hope you're the person chosen at random. That's it!

Oh wait. You MUST include your name and city/state to be eligible.

And also remember, the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, the answer to a puzzle a while back was "Minnesota Twins" — not political at all, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

Here are last week's buttons, in case you forgot:

I Am Proud To Be An American — A World War II-era button, the ultimate patriotic slogan.

Eye Care For You — Courtesy of an optician friend (who was always a good pupil in school).

picture button of Bob Dole — the 1996 Republican nominee for president.

So, when you add American + Eye + Dole, you might end up with ...

American Idol — the Fox TV show where contestants can sing to their heart's content and within years find that their father has been elected senator from Massachusetts.

Anyway, this week's winner, chosen completely at random, is (drum roll) ...

Carol Martini of Chickamauga, Ga.

Wait. Wasn't Carol the randomly-selected winner back on June 16?

She most certainly was. And so, in the interest of keeping ScuttleButton players happy, another person has been randomly selected to share the "winnings." At that person is ... Chuck Dalldorf of Petaluma, Calif.

Wanna be alerted the moment a new ScuttleButton puzzle goes up on the site? (How can you NOT???) Sign up on our mailing list at politicaljunkie@npr.org.

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