This Week's ScuttleButton Winner: Craig Wallace of Olympia, Wash.

Yes, if you must know, I felt quite uncomfortable upon learning that Sen. Harry Reid told a reporter that Ken Rudin had "no Negro dialect." But I'd be more uncomfortable if he criticized my weekly ScuttleButton puzzle, which fortunately he did not.

And with that out of the way, it's time to announce this week's ScuttleButton winner.

But first, a reminder about how to play.

It's easy. Just check out my button puzzle each Friday. Take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and arrive at a familiar saying or a name. (Seriously: a saying that people from Earth might be remotely familiar with.) Submit your answer and hope you're the person chosen at random. That's it!

Oh wait. You MUST include your name and city/state to be eligible.

And also remember, the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, the answer to a puzzle a while back was "Minnesota Twins" — not political at all, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

Here are last week's buttons, in case you forgot:

Impeach Earl Warren — Conservatives, led by the John Birch Society, pushed for the impeachment of the Supreme Court's chief justice in the 1950s.

Peace sign — From the 1969 anti-Vietnam War moratorium.

So, when you add Warren + Peace, you might end up with ...

War and Peace. Which is both an 1869 Russian novel by Leo Tolstoy AND the easiest ScuttleButton puzzle in ScuttleButton history.

Anyway, this week's winner, chosen completely at random, is (drum roll) ... Craig Wallace of Olympia, Wash. Craig took one look at the puzzle and wrote, "It's either the famous mobster Earl 'Fingers' Soprano or the famous Russian novel which everyone has heard of but which no one has ever actually read." I suspect Craig was really guessing the latter.

Wanna be alerted the moment a new ScuttleButton puzzle goes up on the site? (How can you NOT???) Sign up on our mailing list at politicaljunkie@npr.org.

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