Today On TOTN: Energy And Civility — Two Things We Don't Have Enough Of

Another jam-packed Political Junkie segment today on NPR's Talk of the Nation, airing just hours after President Obama announced his views about offshore oil drilling ... a decision designed to reach out to enviromentalists as well as Republicans, but which ultimately may accomplish neither.

NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley joined substitute host Rebecca Roberts and me to talk about the apparent political momentum enjoyed by the administration, especially in the aftermath of the health-care victory and the president's trip to Afghanistan.

Plus: Sarah Palin campaigns for John McCain and against Harry Reid (and we talk about which strategy is likely to be more successful) ... more questions about RNC finances (with the obligatory jokes about the expenses incurred at the West Hollywood sex club ... and the Rubio-Crist GOP debate in Florida.

We also talked with former Rep. Lou Frey (R-FL), who assembled tidbits and advice from some 170 former Members of Congress for his book, Political Rules of the Road. I wonder how Frey, an advocate of civility and bipartisanship, would survive in today's Congress.

What we didn't get to: the announcement today that Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) that she will NOT resign her Senate seat, as she has pledged, and instead will finish out her term, which expires after 2012.

You can hear today's show here.

And last week's segment — the political fallout of the health care vote with special guests Anna Greenberg (D) and Vin Weber (R) — can be heard here.

Join host Neal Conan and me every Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET for the Junkie segment on TOTN, where you can often, but not always, find interesting conversation, useless trivia questions and sparkling jokes. And you can win a Political Junkie T-shirt!

If your local NPR station doesn't carry TOTN, you can always hear the program on the Web or on HD Radio. And if you are a subscriber to XM/Sirius radio, you can find the show there as well (siriusly).

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