This Week's ScuttleButton Winner:  Jason Baker of Chapel Hill, N.C.

I now have the power to walk over to anyone I want and demand that they produce the answer, on the spot, to the previous week's ScuttleButton puzzle.  I owe that all to the Arizona state legislature.

And never mind if you don't know the answer.  What if you don't know how to play?

It's simple.  Every Friday I offer up a vertical presentation of buttons.  Just take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and arrive at a familiar saying or a name. (Seriously: a saying that people from Earth might be remotely familiar with.) Submit your answer and hope you're the person chosen at random. That's it!

Oh wait. You MUST include your name and city/state to be eligible.

Also, the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, the answer to a puzzle awhile back was "Minnesota Twins" — not political at all, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

Here are last week's buttons, in case you forgot:

Presidential Debate 92? / Chicken George — In 1992, Democrats contended that President George H.W. Bush was putting up barriers to avoid debating Bill Clinton.

Never Say Goodbye Say 'Ciao' / The New Night Cap For Lovers — Um no, not a political button.

Maine for Muskie — Sen. Ed Muskie (D-ME), re-elected in Maine in 1964, was the Democratic nominee for vice president four years later.

So, when you add Chicken + Ciao + Maine, you might end up with ...

Chicken Chow Mein — a familiar, if pedestrian, item on a Chinese restaurant in the U.S.

 

This week's winner, chosen completely at random, is (drum roll) ... Jason Baker of Chapel Hill, N.C.  Jason, in submitting his answer, conceded the obvious: "Sometimes, we like the easy ones."

Wanna be alerted the moment a new ScuttleButton puzzle goes up on the site? (How can you NOT???) Sign up for our mailing list at politicaljunkie@npr.org.

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