Shocker In South Carolina — Update: Felony Charge To Boot!

Nothing about Nikki Haley or Mark Sanford or any of that salacious stuff.

No, it's about the Democratic primary for the Senate in South Carolina.

Now, we all know that no one is going to defeat Sen. Jim DeMint (R).  But everyone thought that his opponent in November was going to be ex-judge and former state Rep. Vic Rawl.

Wrong.

The winner, the improbable winner, was Alvin Greene, an unemployed black Army veteran who spent literally nothing on his campaign ... other than the $10,400 filing fee.  He doesn't even have a Web site.

Mother Jones magazine is as baffled about it as the rest of us:

Despite his lack of election funds, Greene claims to have criss-crossed the state during his campaign—though he declined to specify any of the towns or places he visited or say how much money he spent while on the road.

"It wasn’t much, I mean, just, it was—it wasn’t much. Not much, I mean, it wasn’t much," he said, when asked how much of his own money he spent in the primary. Greene frequently spoke in rapid-fire, fragmentary sentences, repeating certain phrases or interrupting himself multiple times during the same sentence while he searched for the right words. But he was emphatic about certain aspects of his candidacy, insisting that details about his campaign organization, for instance, weren't relevant. "I'm not concentrating on how I was elected—it's history. I’m the Democratic nominee—we need to get talking about America back to work, what's going on, in America."

Update at 2:1 0 p.m. ET. And now there's this:

"Court records show 32-year-old Alvin Greene was arrested in November and charged with showing obscene Internet photos to a University of South Carolina student," the Associated Press reports. "The felony charge carries up to five years in prison. Greene said he had no comment when asked about the charge Wednesday and hung up on a reporter. The unemployed veteran posted bond after his arrest. He has yet to enter a plea or be indicted."

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