This Week's ScuttleButton Winner: Brian Engel of Dallas, Texas

Being chosen as the winner of the coveted ScuttleButton puzzle award is an emotional thing all right, but NOT winning it can be even more emotional.  Just ask Rep. Bob Etheridge (D-NC).

The key, of course, is knowing how to play.

Every Friday on this blog I offer up a vertical presentation of buttons.  The goal:  Take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and arrive at a familiar saying or a name. (Seriously: a saying that people from Earth might be remotely familiar with.) Submit your answer and hope you're the person chosen at random. That's it!

Oh wait. You MUST include your name and city/state to be eligible.

Also, the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, the answer to a puzzle awhile back was "Minnesota Twins" — not political at all, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

Here are last week's buttons, in case you forgot:

Stuart Ain for Congress — The Republican candidate in New York's 6th District, he lost to Democratic incumbent Lester Wolff.

I Miss Ike / Heck, I Even Miss Truman! — A classic anti-JFK button, circa 1962.

B 4 Burdick — Quentin Burdick, a North Dakota Democrat, was first elected to the Senate in a special 1960 election.

Haaven Congress '72 — He was defeated by Rep. Bob Bergland (D) of Minnesota.

So, when you add Ain + Miss + B + Haaven, you might end up with ...

Ain't Misbehavin' — The Fats Waller song from 1929 that morphed into a musical in 1978.

A good percentage wanted to know if current South Carolina politics is what led to that selection this week.

Anyway, this week's winner, chosen completely at random, is (drum roll) ... Brian Engel of Dallas, Texas.

Wanna be alerted the moment a new ScuttleButton puzzle goes up on the site? (How can you NOT???) Sign up for our mailing list at politicaljunkie@npr.org.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: