This Week's ScuttleButton Winner: Cory Springhorn of Shoreview, Minn.

As traumatic as it was to see the U.S. lose its World Cup match on Saturday, there is some good news as well:  Americans have won the ScuttleButton puzzle contest all but twice in its brief history.  And if that doesn't bring out the vuvuzela in you, then I don't know what will.

Before we announce the latest winner, here are the rules on how to play.

Every Friday on this blog I offer up a vertical presentation of buttons.  The goal:  Take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and arrive at a familiar saying or a name. (Seriously: a saying that people from Earth might be remotely familiar with.) Submit your answer and hope you're the person chosen at random. That's it!

Oh wait. You MUST include your name and city/state to be eligible.

Also, the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, the answer to a puzzle awhile back was "Minnesota Twins" — not political at all, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

Here are last week's buttons, in case you forgot:

Cass Congress — Cass Ballenger, a North Carolina Republican, served in Congress from 1987 until his retirement in 2004.

Bye, Bye Birdie — This is an anti-Lady Bird/Lynda Bird Johnson button from 1964, playing off the "Bye Bye Birdie" movie theme.

Friend of Fred — Fred Seaton was the unsuccessful Republican nominee for governor of Nebraska in 1962.

We for Lee — Lee Alexander, the former mayor of Syracuse, sought the Democratic nomination for the Senate from New York in 1974.

blank button — Well, what can I say?  It's a blank, all-white button.

So, when you add Cass + Birdie + Friend + Lee + (blank), you might end up with ...

Casper the Friendly Ghost.  The subject of a comic book, a movie and a TV show, the very friendly Casper should not be confused with Spooky, the Tuff Little Ghost.  Just sayin'.

This week's winner, chosen completely at random, is (drum roll) ... Cory Springhorn of Shoreview, Minn. Cory says he was momentarily fooled by the blank button:

At first I figured it was either to promote the Beatles' famous album, or possibly one of David Duke's campaigns.

Wanna be alerted the moment a new ScuttleButton puzzle goes up on the site? (How can you NOT???) Sign up for our mailing list at politicaljunkie@npr.org.

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