This Week's ScuttleButton Winner: Jan Ziff of Scottsdale, Ariz.

George Steinbrenner is gone, and now there is only one thing remaining that divides America:  ScuttleButton puzzles.

Last week the puzzle was too easy, according to reader sentiment.  The week before, the complaint was: too difficult.  Why can't the puzzles be in the middle, they want to know.

Hey, this ain't porridge.*

Either way, there are rules as to how to play.

Every Friday on this blog I offer up a vertical presentation of buttons.  The goal:  Take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and arrive at a familiar saying or a name. (Seriously: a saying that people from Earth might be remotely familiar with.) Submit your answer and hope you're the person chosen at random. That's it!

Oh wait. You MUST include your name and city/state to be eligible.

Also, the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, the answer to a puzzle awhile back was "Minnesota Twins" — not political at all, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

Here are last week's buttons, in case you forgot:

Another Soccer Mom for Clinton Gore — from the Democrats' successful 1996 re-election campaign.

Toomey for U.S. Senate — Pat Toomey is the Republican nominee for the Senate seat currently held by Pennsylvania Democrat Arlen Specter.

So, when you add Soccer + Toomey, you might end up with ...

Soccer Toomey.  Oops, I mean Sock It To Me — the famous line from the 1960s TV show "Laugh In" that became even more famous when repeated by the man who would become the 37th president of the United States:

This week's winner, chosen completely at random, is (drum roll) ... Jan Ziff of Scottsdale, Ariz.

Meanwhile, Robert Marlow of Annandale, N.J., has this wonderful Laugh In memory:

Some years ago I was watching a Laugh-In rerun when, during this segment, Dan Rowan began a "News of the Future" story by saying "President Ronald Reagan..." and then pausing for the laugh.

Wanna be alerted the moment a new ScuttleButton puzzle goes up on the site? (How can you NOT???) Sign up for our mailing list at politicaljunkie@npr.org.

*Ali Diercks of Bloomington, Ind., insists that I explain the porridge reference.  Just as Goldilocks had to deal with porridge that was too hot and too cold — preferring it to be just right — I am constantly met with complaints about puzzles being too hard and too easy, and pleas that they are somewhere in the middle, i.e., just right.

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