This Week's ScuttleButton Winner: Beth Roth of Winston-Salem, N.C.

Thank goodness President Obama is days away from signing an extension on unemployment insurance benefits.  Every time I come up with a lame ScuttleButton puzzle I'm constantly threatened with getting fired.  At least Congress was thinking of me during these trying times.

Actually, last week's puzzle was pretty good, if you ask me.  Even if many people who sent in their answers had the solution backwards.  But more on that later.

First, a reminder on how to play.

Every Friday on this blog I offer up a vertical presentation of buttons.  The goal:  Take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and arrive at a familiar saying or a name. (Seriously: a saying that people from Earth might be remotely familiar with.) Submit your answer and hope you're the person chosen at random. That's it!

Oh wait. You MUST include your name and city/state to be eligible.

Also, the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, the answer to a puzzle awhile back was "Minnesota Twins" — not political at all, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

Here are last week's buttons, in case you forgot:

Mead / Your Man For Governor — Sen. James Mead, a New York Democrat, unsuccessfully ran for governor in 1946, losing to incumbent Republican Thomas Dewey.

Ball for Congress — Republican Thomas Ball ousted Rep. William Fitzgerald (D) in Connecticut's 2nd District in 1938 but lost the rematch two years later.

Olson / Sands — The 1980 successful GOP ticket in North Dakota of Allen Olson for governor and Ernest Sands for lt. gov.

Mike Synar's Third Annual Barbeque and Pig Picking — Not only did then-Oklahoma congressman Synar (D) hold a pig roast for the media for years and years in the 1980s and '90s, he produced a button for each event!

Getty Congress — Charles Getty was the unsuccessful GOP nominee against Rep. John Murtha (D-PA) in 1980.

So, when you add Mead + Ball + Sands + Pig + Getty, you might end up with ...

Meatballs and Spaghetti. Lots of people complained that I got it backwards, that it should read "spaghetti and meatballs."  First of all, I was taught "meatballs and spaghetti," not the other way around.  But more important, if I did it that way, the buttons wouldn't have worked.  And that's all that matters here.

Meanwhile, let's get on to the winner, because I'm getting hungry.  And this week's winner, chosen completely at random, is (drum roll) ... Beth Roth of Winston-Salem, N.C.

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