What Is The American Constitution Party, Tom Tancredo's New Home?

Former Rep. Tom Tancredo, a Colorado Republican, is in the process of leaving the GOP to run for governor as a candidate of the American Constitution Party.  The move threatens to split the Republican Party and hand over the governorship to John Hickenlooper, currently the mayor of Denver.  (See Monday's Junkie post here.)

Some may argue that the problems facing GOP candidates Scott McInnis and Dan Maes are already paving the way for a Governor Hickenlooper.  But that's for another day.

The question here:  What exactly is the American Constitution PartyDenver Post's Jessica Fender sums up its platform.  It seeks to:

•Allow state legislatures, not voters, to pick U.S. senators

•Repeal an act making it illegal to use force or the threat of force to interfere with a woman seeking an abortion

•Abolish congressional pensions

•End the Endangered Species Act

•Terminate the departments of Energy and Education, the Food and Drug Administration, the Federal Election Commission and the Internal Revenue Service

•Ban electronic voting to prevent voter fraud

•Repeal all federal campaign- finance laws

•Repeal the Voting Rights Act of 1965

•End compulsory school attendance and promote education at home, private schools or religious schools

•End any domestic federal aid not provided for in the Constitution, as it is "not only illegal, it is immoral"

•End foreign aid and participation in multinational groups, such as the United Nations, as well as multinational treaties

•Retake the Panama Canal

•Prevent women from serving in combat as "these 'advances' undermine the integrity, morale and performance of our military organizations"

•"Cease financing or arming of belligerents in the world's troubled areas"

•Return to the people all federal lands held by the government without constitutional authorization

•Bar any attempt to legalize the union of gay couples

•Immediately collect all foreign debts owed to the U.S.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.