Pass the Rouge, Please*

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Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

If you're a radio producer, it's well known that the best freebies you're likely to get are books. Walk around NPR, and you'll see delightfully filled shelves of review copies. Now, I love books with a passion, but now I just ignore the giveaway shelves. But when my friend who works at a women's magazine talks about walking by the piles of potions, creams, mascaras, and lipsticks, I am horrified. The giveaway pile is always greener, I guess. Janet Carlson Reed, beauty editor of Town and Country, gets to sort through these delicious spa-like treats... and she's written about the delights — and downsides — to her job. What are the perks of yours?

*When did rouge become blush? Blush seems much more prudish. I, for one, apply rouge.

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What's your educational background?
How did you get such a great job?

Sent by Jessica | 3:49 PM | 7-31-2007

Hooray for TOTN listeners for ensuring that the make-up section was not all giggling and talk of mascara. I'm glad the two callers focused the discussion on health issues, as opposed to spa treatments.

Sent by Veronica | 3:55 PM | 7-31-2007

My wife & I were readers of another travel/beauty/ fitness women's magazine (Shape) but tired of what seemed to be endless product placements. How important are they to the business model?

Sent by Phil Stenstrom | 4:00 PM | 7-31-2007

Normally, I simply scoff at the proceedings of the beauty industry. This feature however, was lucid, interesting and intelligently presented. I find myself better able to appreciate why people take their appearance so seriously. Ms Carlson Reed, you deserve credit for your forthright and informative answers to the listeners questions.

Sent by Tony Anderson | 5:43 AM | 8-1-2007