Coming Up

September 25th Show

Yesterday, our first hour discussion tackled some of the reasons why parents of black and white students choose segregated schools for their children. Today our show pendulum swings in the direction of integration. Fifty years ago today, nine black students attended their first full day of classes at the previously all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. But in the present day, has that historical moment lead to greater racial integration in your life? Just how important is racial diversity to you at work, in your neighborhood, in social circles? And do you feel economic class makes segregation unavoidable? Following that, we'll talk about the United Auto Workers' strike with New York Times writer Micheline Maynard.

I have often heard it said that English is one of the hardest languages to learn... and I can see their point. The letter 'e' can completely change the meaning of a word and alter its pronunciation (think 'man' and 'mane'). And don't get me started on the 'i' before 'e' rule. This may call for some creative intervention. Tom Miller is the editor of "How I learned English," a collection of essays from prominent Latino Americans about ways they mastered the English language. And Congressman Jose Serrano will join us. He wrote an essay called, "Learning English by the Sinatra Method." Yes, THE Frank Sinatra. No doubt Congressman Serrano may have mastered the language of crooning as well. Following that, we'll talk to Chicago Public Radio reporter Natalie Y. Moore who believes that while text messaging may be great for getting to know one another, it could actually kill romance. And we'll read from your letters and blog comments about sex offender registries, the Israel Lobby and U.S. foreign policy, and things lost...and found.

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