Coming Up

October 10th Show

In today's first hour, we'll talk about the swan dive the dollar has taken recently. At present, it will cost you more than $1.50 to buy one euro, and the British pound is worth twice the dollar. So that means if you're planning a trip overseas, you may want to start passing the hat for some extra change because the dollar won't stretch very far once you get there. But while most companies, businesses, and overseas vacationers are feeling the crunch, there are some economists who say the falling dollar is actually a GOOD thing. A sales manager, an economist, and a money reporter explain why, and talk about how the falling dollar could affect your life and your business. Following that, our own Ken Rudin will grace our airwaves with a look at Fred Thompson's debut in yesterday's Republican debate, the latest Iowa polls, and which Democratic presidential candidates have withdrawn their names from the upcoming primary in Michigan.

In our second hour, we'll talk to Janet Reno about... MUSIC. She has a deep love for songs that seem to define the pulse of America. She, along with a member of her family, has put together a three disc compilation project entitled Song of America featuring music that dates from 1492 to the present day. The songs are performed by contemporary artists, one of whom is Ben Taylor, who will also be joining the show along with the album's co-producer. Call in with your favorite song that, for you, captures the heart of America. Following that segment, Neal Conan — our personal die-hard Yankees flag waver — will talk about the uncertain future of Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez. Apparently there is a clause in his ten year contract that allows him to opt out and become a free agent. If he decides to do this, negotiations could start at 30 million dollars a year. Yes. Thirty. Million. What should he do? Should he stay with the Yankees? Become a free agent? What would YOU do if you were A-Rod? Geez, we should ALL have his problems.

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